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bibliography - Michele Chan Annotated bibliography Sleep...

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Michele Chan Annotated bibliography: Sleep deprivation on memory functions Jian-Lin, Q., Yong-Cong, S., Danmin, M., Ming, F., Guo-Hua, B., & Zheng, Y. (2010). The Effects Of 43 Hours Of Sleep Deprivation On Executive Control Functions: Event-Related Potential In a Visual Go/No Go Task. Social Behavior & Personality: An International Journal, 38(1), 29-42. Retrieved from Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection database. The focus of this study was to test how 43 hours of sleep deprivation affects the executive control functions. There were 40 participants and there were two test group, control, which had no sleep deprivation and the sleep deprivation group. They were both tested at 2am on day 3 where they had accumulated 43 hours of sleep deprivation. Then an EEG recording was doen while a Go/No task was administrated. They found that there was a noticeable difference and impairment of executive control. The participant underwent some pretesting as they got to use the No/Go prior to sleep deprivation until they could maintain 95% accuratecy with the program to account for inate differences in using the program. They also choose university students who were on the same wake up and sleep schedule on a daily pace and monitored the food and time they ate. All of the students were of the same gender, males. They had never been in a psychological study before, nor had they any medical issues and were all right handed and had normal vision, which is important to control as the test required reading a computer screen and clicking to select an answer. They were also not allowed alcoholic beverages or caffeine a week prior to the test. The only confounds I thought were relevant was the fact that the first days of testing they learned how to take the test the day right before actually testing, so some affect can be attributed to simple familiarity and maturation with the task at hand. Furthermore, although
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Michele Chan monitoring the gender differences increases the validity of the experiment, I would have preferred to see the results with another gender.
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