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thursday and tuesday march 31

thursday and tuesday march 31 - Thursday Jacksonian era is...

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Thursday March 25, 2010 Jacksonian era is a society that is in theory far more democratic than previously. The elite does not rule over everyone. Rewards should be granted to those talented and not just given. The emphasis is on the self-made man. So society is now egalitarian in theory in the 1830, especially contrasted against the classes of Europe. In the 1830’s white men are allowed to vote and hold property. However, they don’t share it with women or slaves which go against the idea of equality. They use biology to justify the distinctions, natural inequalities between the people. As we see the broadening of democratic impulse, we see the hardening of racist and sexist thoughts. Middle class women worked until marriage and then had kids every two years. They worked on farms then mills and then got married. They typically had 5 to 10 pregnancies in their lifetime where 5 to 8 children would survive. They had to raise children and work on the house, by gardening, and doing domestic cleaning. They were responsible for almost all food production. It was lots and lots of child rearing in the 18 th century. Marriage meant years of hard farm labor and the bearing of children. When societies industrialized it changes in two main ways. One is the declining fertility rates of white women, dropped from 7 to 3.6 from 1800 to 1900. It reflects industrialization and the market revolution. They don’t need as many children to help out at the farm. By contrast in industrialized society, the child does not work for the family but for someone else. So the motivation to have children is not as great. In a market society when you are use to balancing and using currency, you think more rationally about family planning and how more children is a greater financial obligation. Most of the food production and household production were done by women but then It moved to the factories. Women were known as spinsters and the era is defined by the idea of a spinster. The root of the word comes from the word spin from the loom, she spun cloth at their parent’s household. It lost the association with spinning thread. Production moves outside the household. The new role of middle class white women is to lavish attention on her children and husband is referred to as the cult of domesticity. A drawing in 1833 of a middle class family shows how the home has lost its productivity. It is a center of domestic refinement and comfortable. Women are supposed to create a refuge from the stress of the market place. In the 18 th century no one thought of kids as precious baby and there were no romanticism about child rearing. By the 19 th century as you only have a few children, it is no longer a chore but a joy. Another part of the
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