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Heed Their Rising Voices article

Heed Their Rising Voices article - 9 THE NEW YORK TIMES...

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Unformatted text preview: 9'. THE NEW YORK TIMES, TUESDAY. MARCH 29, 1960. 1. [APPENDIX] 66 The growing movement of peaceful mass demonstrations by Negroes is something new in the South, something understandable. . . . Let Congress heed their rising voices. for they will be heard), V- ._ Heed Their —.Neuo Yuri firm: editorial. Saturday, March”. 19 Rising Voices ’ S the whole world knows by now, thousands of Southern Negro students are engaged in wide- spread non-violent demonstrations in positive affirma- tion of theright to live in human dignity as guaranteed by the U. S. Constitution and the Bill of Righlx. In their efforts to uphold these guarantees, they are being met by an unprecedented wave of terror by those who would deny and negate that document which the whole world looks upon as setting the pattern for modern freedom. . . . In Orangeburg, South Carolina1 when 400 students peacefully sought to buy doughnuts and coffee at lunch counters in the business district, they were iorcihly ejected, tear-gassed, soakcd to the skin in freezing weather with fire hoses, arrested on mass: and herded into an open barbed-wire stockade to stand for hours in the bitter cold. In Montgomery, Alabama, after students sang “My Country. 'l‘is of Thee” on the State Capitol steps, their leaders were expelled from school, and truck- loads of police armed with shotguns and tear-gas ringed the Alabama State College Campus. When the entire student body protested to state authorities by refusing to re-register, their dining hall was pad- locked in an attempt to starve them into submission. In Tallahame, Atlanta, Nashville, Savannah, Greensboro, Memphis, Richmond, Charlotte, and a host of other cities in the South, young American teen- agers, in face of the entire weight of official state appa- ratus and police power, have boldly stepped forth as protagonists of democracy. Their courage and amaz- ing restraint have inspired millions and given a new dignity to the cause of freedom. Small wonder that the Southern violators of the Constitution fear this new, non-violent brand of freedom fighter . . . even as they fear the upswelling right-to-vote movement. Small wonder that they are determined to destroy the one man who, more than any other. symbolizes the new spirit now sweeping the South—the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., world- lamoua leader of the Montgomery Bus Protest. For it i! his doctrine oi non-violence which has inspired and guided the students in their widening wave of sit- ins; and it this same Dr. King who founded and is president of the Southern Christian Leadership Con- lerencc—the organization which is spearheading the surging right-to-vote movement. Under Dr. King's direclion the Leadership Conference conducts Stu- dent Workshops and Seminars in the philosophy and technique of non-violent resistance. Again and again the Southern violators have answered Dr. King’s peaceful protests with intimida- tion and violence, They have bombed his home almost killing his wife and child. They have assaulted his person. They have arrested him seven times—for “speeding." “loitering" and similar “offenses." And now they have charged him with “perjury"—o felony under which they could imprison him for m: yam. Obviously, their real purpose is to remove him physi- cally as the leader to whom the students and millions of others—look for guidance and support, and thereby to intimidate all leaders who may rise in the South. Their strategy is to behead this affirmative movement, and thus to dcmoralize Negro Americans and weaken their will to struggle. The defense of Martin Luther King, spiritual leader of the student sit-in movement. clearly, therefore, is an integral part of the total struggle for freedom in the South. Decent-minded Americans cannot help but applaud the creative daring of the students and the quiet heroism of Dr. King. But this is one of those moments in the stormy history of Freedom when men and women of good will must do more than applaud the rising-to-glory of others. The America whose good name hangs in the balance before a watchful world, the America whose heritage of Liberty these Southern Upholders of the Constitution ure defending. is our Anterica as well as theirs . . . We must heed their rising voices—yes—but we must add our own. We must extend ourselves above and beyond moral support and render the material help so urgently needed by those who are taking the risks, facing jail, and even death in a glorious re-aifirmation of our Constitution and its Bill of Rights. We urge you to join hands with our fellow Amer- icons in the South by supporting, with your dollars, this Combined Appeal for all three needs—the defense of Martin Luther King—the support of the embattled Imdeflb—and the struggle for the right-to-vote. Your Help Is Urgently Needed . . . NOW! ! Stella Adlai DI. Alon Knight (llllfllfll Raymond Plea Alexander Richard Con Henry Van Amielc Nat King Cele Hurry hleiontc Cheryl (revival Jul.- Isl-lent: Dorothy Dmvlridse Dr. Algernon lied! Onie Devil Marc fiilztcin Sammy Davis. Jr. William Bunch Ruby Dee Marlon Brando Dc. Philip Elliott Mn. Ralph lunch: Di. Hu Emmn Dish-an Carroll Foldiz Anthony Francis“ John Kilian: L. Joseph Overturn Maureen Shpktcn Lorain: Hansbury Emile Kilt Clarence Pickett Fr-nl Silver- Rev. Donald Harrington Rabbi Edvard Klein Shed Puliu' Hop; Steam Net Heats“ Hope Lang: Sidney Poitier 5“.“ him; Jamel Hid. John Lewis A. Philip Randolph a,“ Gardner c_ May Hlnhan Viveea Lindlm John Rain Taylor Vu- Hcflin Carl Murphy Elmer Rice Norma Thomas llngsten Hugh“ Dan Mun-y Julie Robinson Kenneth Tynan Mari! luxhewitz John Money Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt Charles Whit: Mlllllie Jackson A. J. Multe Bayard Rustin Shelley Wilden Mmdsesi Johnson Frederick O'Neal Robert Ryan Mu Youngilain Please mail this coupon TODAY! We in the south who are struggling daily [or dignity and freedom warmly endorse this appeal r----------1 Rev. Ralph D. Ahemllhy Rev. Matthew D. Rev. Walter L Hamilton Rev. A. L. Davis (Mmgomuy. All.) MeCoIiem S (Norfolk. Va.) (Nerrlum,l4.) I committee To bound Martin Luther King I , . C Rev. Fred L smmmmh 'o'm‘bw’ ) 96.3... ;.,s.c.) Mn. Katie i. mom in“ (Birmingham, Ah.) a“ wan", Holmls R" Maninlutlmlting 5' (New Mun-,h.) l 1'qu Struggle For Freedom In The South I . . Bordon . ' . Rev. Kelley Miller Smith (Atlanta,6a.) Rev. W. H. Hal (Narhville,Tmn.) WWW") a... Hm, c. Bunion (Mamba... Min.) I 312 w'" 12:39:...» 2: Y“ 27' N’ v. I n... w. A. mm Rev. Dongle: Mo... 0.1mm, Tm) m 1. E_ may Ivan-o on I (Chomnoogs, Tenn.) (vali'm: N- c-l ”(7439;13:11th (Mobile, All.) I In: enduring my contribution at 3 Rev. c. K. Stale Rev. Wyatt lee Waller R". 5......“ w. warmI Rev. 1‘. J. Janina t9! "'0 writ of the Conn-inn. (Yellahanu. Fla.) (Petmbwg. Va.) [Allanll,Gl.) (hum Range, ts.) . a I (run: mm luv-R CDMMl'l'lEE T0 DEFEND MAR'llN LUTHER KING AND THE STRUGGLE FOR FREEDOM [N THE SMITH 312 West 125th Street, New York 27, N. Y. UNiversity 6-1700 C”! D I Hall to htlp I] ”use and forth" information Chairmen: A. Philip Randolph, Dr. Gardner C. Taylor; Chairman of Culluml Diuiyian: Harry Belafonle, Sidney I Poitier; Tuarurer: Nat King Cole; Executive Director: Bayard Rustin; Chairmen of Chord: Division: Father George Pm" ""k' “Nth M3“! *0: B. Ford, Rev. Harry Emerson Fosdick, Rev. Thomas Kilgore, In, Rabbi Edward E. Klein; Chairman 0/ Labor Diui- I Commits" To Defend Martin Luther King :iun: Mom's lushcwitz MWII— I d ...
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