Mar02_09_Coasts

Mar02_09_Coasts - Coasts Coastal areas join land and sea....

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Coasts Coastal areas join land and sea. Coasts are shaped by marine and terrestrial processes.
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Coasts Are Shaped by Marine and Terrestrial Processes Sea levels past and future. (a) Sea level rose rapidly at the end of the last ice age as glaciers and ice caps melted and water returned to the ocean. The rate of rise has slowed over the past 4,000 years and is now believed to be between 1.0 and 2.4 millimeters per year. (b) Projections of sea level through the year 2100. Seven research groups (represented here by colored lines) have estimated future sea level based on historical observations and climate models. Even the most conservative of these predictions estimates a 20- centimeter (8-inch) rise.
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(top-left) The southeastern coast of the United States looked much different 18,000 years ago, during the last ice age. Because of lower sea level, the position of the gently sloping southeastern coast has been as much as 200 kilometers (125 miles) seaward from the present shoreline, leaving much of the continental shelf exposed. (bottom-left) In the distant future, if the ocean were to expand and the polar ice caps were to melt because of global warming, sea level could rise perhaps 60 meters (200 feet), driving the coast inland as much as 250 kilometers (160 miles)
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The long-term change in global sea level. Tectonic motions and isostatic adjustment (uplift and subsidence) can change the height and shape of a coast. Wind and currents, seiches, storm surges, an El Nino or La Nina
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This note was uploaded on 10/07/2011 for the course OCS 1005 taught by Professor Condrey during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Mar02_09_Coasts - Coasts Coastal areas join land and sea....

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