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Ch 2 - Maps - Introduction to Geography GEO 2000 Weekly...

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Introduction to Geography GEO 2000 Weekly Topic: Maps
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Representation with Maps Maps are a geographer’s primary tool of spatial analysis Only through maps can spatial distributions be reduced to an observable scale and compared; in other words, things field observation would not reveal Cartography is the art, science and technology of making maps
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Representation with Maps What can maps do? Maps: can help wage war, be used as political propaganda, locate pollution extent, can warn of hazards, keep me from getting lost.
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Map Information Where are you? How are maps set up? Important elements : The Earth’s grid system Latitude Longitude Prime Meridian Know these definitions!!
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Map Elements Basic map element : Earth’s Grid System : Set of imaginary lines drawn across face of Earth Key reference points on grid system: North pole South pole Equator Prime Meridian
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Map Elements North Pole South Pole Equator
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Map Elements North Pole South Pole Distance b/n N & S Pole is 180 degrees Distance b/n Pole & equator Is 90 degrees
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Map Elements Based on this information : Latitude is the angular distance north or south of the equator, measured in degrees ranging from 0 degrees (where?) to 90 degrees (where?).
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Map Information Measuring latitude : Polar circumference of the earth is 24,899 miles SO, distance between each degree of latitude equals 24899/360 degrees or about 111 kilometers (69 miles) Degrees are divided into 60 minutes (‘) Each minute has 60 seconds (“) Just like 1 hour of time!
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Map Information Measuring latitude : 1 degree of latitude = 69 miles (111 km) 1 minute of latitude = 1.15 miles (1.85 km) 1 second of latitude = 101 feet (31 m) Example: Port of Palm Beach Latitude: 26 degrees, 46 minutes, 19 seconds North Equator is the starting point (0 degrees) to measure latitude (N/S direction) Starting point for E/W direction is the Prime Meridian Lines of Latitude
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Map Elements Prime Meridian : Imaginary line passing through Royal Naval Observatory at Greenwich, England. This is because England had the most powerful navy at the time Meridians get farther apart at equator, converge at poles Greenwich, England Greenwich Prime Meridian Zero degrees
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Map Elements Longitude : Angular distance east or west of the prime (zero) meridian measured in degrees ranging from zero to 180. Opposite the prime meridian is the 180th meridian, which is the International Date Line New days start here, so it bends so that island chains do not get broken up and Russia is all on the same day
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Map Elements Time depends on longitude.
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