Assignment 9 - Leah Brown Garrett Aryan Riley Craddock...

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Leah Brown Garrett Aryan Riley Craddock Literature Review Leah Brown: Of all the strange sleep disorders, sleep paralysis is perhaps the most mysterious. A surprising amount of people through various studies have come forward each with their own unique account(s) of their sleep paralysis experience. “Sleep paralysis (SP) may occur either when a person is falling asleep or awakening. During SP, the individual experiences full-body paralysis, often accompanied by vivid frightening auditory or visual hallucinations”. (Paradis, Friedman, Hinton, McNally, Solomon & Lyons 2009). SP most often occurs only once in a young adult's life, however those who claim to suffer from severe SP can have accounts occurring as often as every week. “Among university student populations in various countries report SP rates to range from 21% to 42%” (Paradis, Friedman, Hinton, McNally, Solomon & Lyons 2009). Some research has found higher rates in young African American women. Most importantly, research has suggested that SP is most often affiliated with all types of anxiety-disorders. Anxiety-disorders are notorious for disrupting regular sleeping patterns and in turn could possibly lead to an SP experience. “SP is especially common among anxiety-disordered members of certain ethnic minority groups. It was found that the rates of SP in African Americans were 59%” (Paradis, Friedman, Hinton, McNally, Solomon & Lyons 2009). People who reported having cases of Panic Disorder, Generalized Anxiety-disorder, and PTSD appeared to share a strong relationship with those who suffer from sleep disorders and especially SP. “Individuals with SP report signi±cantly more stressful life experiences than those without SP” (Paradis 2009). These accounts were collected from an in-depth survey of people who reported having at least one instance of SP. One common theme that has been noted throughout the globe, is the feeling of terror and a presence while suffering from SP. “J. Allan Cheyne a psychologist of the University of Waterloo in
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Leah Brown Garrett Aryan Riley Craddock Literature Review Canada has collected more than 28,000 tales of sleep paralysis” (Bower, 2005). It can be said that “Two brain systems contribute to sleep paralysis, Cheyne proposes. The most prominent one consists of inner-brain structures that monitor one's surroundings for threats and launches responses to perceived dangers. As Cheyne sees it, REM-based activation of this system, in the absence of any real threat, triggers a sense of an ominous entity lurking nearby. A second brain system, which includes sensory
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This note was uploaded on 10/10/2011 for the course PSYCH 1310 taught by Professor Meeks during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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Assignment 9 - Leah Brown Garrett Aryan Riley Craddock...

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