101researchvideogames(1)-1

101researchvideogames(1)-1 - McGill May 4 20 Final Draft...

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Unformatted text preview: McGill May 4, 20 Final Draft Effects of Video Games “There is a significant relation between exposure to media violence and aggressive behavior. “ This is a quote from Craig Anderson, PhD, and director of the Center for the Study of Violence. He and many of professionals in the field believe that aggressive and violence on television, music, and even video games has a direct link with aggression in children today. I myself am an avid gamer and play multiple hours of video games a week. Often times when playing aggressive or violent video games I find myself getting angry and often time I shout because of the game. In no way do I take my anger out on other people, but the fact is video games can make me angry. This is why I chose to research this topic. I really want to find some information about this question; do video games really make peOple more aggressive? In my essay I am going to try and find the best results that either support or deny this hypothesis. Video games have been around since the 1940’s and have grown into one of the biggest industries around today. It’s is amazing to see where video games have come from and the first video games that people came to know. The very first “video game” if you can call it that, was basically a machine with buttons and knobs attached. Then somebody simply manipulated these to simulate a helicopter shooting down aircrafts one after the other. A scientist created this first video game and I bet he never knew what was to come out of it. Since then, technology has grown enormously and has gotten so big that now you can play video games on phones and other mobile devices. As technology grows and we get new items for example, the ipad and iphone, video games and the video game industry will keep growing. I remember as a kid playing Super Mario Brothers on our NES, Nintendo Entertainment System, with my brother. Since then video games and video game consoles have gotten so complex and advanced, that we can play online with people half way across the world, which as a kid seemed impossible. There are so many different kinds of games ranging from role-playing games to life simulation games. According to research done by Tobias Greitemeyer and Silvia Osswald, in 2004 alone the United States recorded that sales of video games had gone above 9.9 billion dollars. In a survey done by Kaiser Family Foundation, an average of 52 percent of children play some form of video game on a console or handheld device on a daily basis. Also, one-third of these kids not only play on consoles, but they play on the computer too. This study was focused on kids aging from 8 to 18. Most people view video games as entertainment for kids below 21. They think that only kids would play games and pretend like that. But, research has proven otherwise. The average age of people who participate in video games is moving quickly towards the age group of 25-40 year olds according to a study done by Nielson Active Gamer in 2005. The main focus of my paper is going to be on the effects video games on children in school and also how they act outside of school. Many people that do research believe that video games, especially violent games, have a negative affect on kids and their schoolwork. Also, there are people that believe the opposite. They think that video 3 games have no correlation between kids and their grades, and some research suggests that some video games actually help kids. In a study done by Dr. Cheryl Olson, results showed that children, who participated with their siblings at a younger age, were two times as likely to play rated “mature” games. This study was done with about 1,245 students in random public schools. Most of these kids were from ages 12 to 14(Harvard Mental Health Letter pg. 2-3). People, who believe that video games affect children’s schoolwork, think that it is because of the content in the games that they are playing. In rated-mature games, the main objective is to kill the enemy and you not to die. This is repeated constantly over the course of the game. Many scientists and psychologists believe that this is the reason that kids grades can be hurt, and also can lead to aggressive behavior and bullying. Also, with the technology that we have and that we will have, the violence in video games looks much more realistic and life-like. This also, might contribute to problems caused by these games. There are some things that people are doing to make sure that these kids won’t be too affected by rated mature games. In the city that I’m from, places that sell video games won’t sell rated mature games to people that are under the age of 18. Also, parents are asked to limit the amount of time that kids spend on video games, and the content that is in the games that they play. According to a study done by Walsh & Chasco in 2003, an average of 3-5 hours a week is spent on playing video games between ages two to seven. This stat gets worse as the children get older. Children in grades eighth and ninth grade play an average of nine to ten hours a week playing video games. Playing violent video games leads to an increase in aggressive behavior, actions, and thoughts. In studies done, the participants who played violent video games where more likely to overreact and judge the act as an act of aggression instead of an accidental occurrence. Also, violent video games can increase anxiety levels and produce a state of hostility. According to an article written by Tobias Geitemeyer and Silvia Osswald, “Playing video games has been shown to lead to an increase in aggressive thoughts, feelings, and behavior”(Greitemeyer and Osswald p. 211). This statement doesn’t rule out that there might be evidence that video games could have positive effects on kids today. This gives us the opportunity to see what kind of positive effects can come from video games. A topic that I really wanted to research and find more about was the effect that violent video games have on a person’s social behavior. According to Greitemeyer, playing violent video games brings about antisocial behavior and these video games also lessen prosocial behavior of the participant. There isn’t very much data or information on if video games can foster prosocial behavior, so Greitemeyer and Osswald conducted a series of experiment to try and find out some information. In one experiment they used a combination of women and men, for a total of 54 people who participated in the experiment (38 women, 16 men). The participants randomly played one of four games that were available. The researchers had set up four video games with different purposes. They had two games that were prosocial games, one neutral game, and one aggressive game. Each participant was allowed ten minutes to play the one game, then afier the ten- minute period, each person answered a questionnaire asked by the researchers. When the participants filled out the questions, most participants answered that the more aggressive game was the most frustrating and difficult. Of all the games available, the most people found that the two prosocial games were more enjoyable and fun. Also, researchers ! 5 recorded that the people who played the prosocial games were more likely to perform more prosocial acts, then the people who played the neutral or aggressive game. Even though this is one experiment it still proves what the researchers were trying to prove, some video games can foster prosocial behavior. As I said earlier there isn’t much proof that some video games might have a positive effect on kids, but there is some evidence and were some studies done that give some proof that games can have a positive effect. In another study done by Greitemeyer and Osswald, they had random subjects play three different forms of video games. The three different kinds of video games were aggressive, neutral, and prosocial. Afier the subject was done playing the video game, the tester would “accidentally” knock over some pencils, which would land on the floor. Then the tester would see whether the subject would help them or not. After all of the subjects had gone through the process, it was clear that the people that had played the prosocial video game, were more likely to help pick up the pencils than the people who had played either the neutral or aggressive video games. This might not be the best evidence in the world, but researchers now have some information to study off of and as a result can conduct further experiments that will reach better answers. Video games are a great form of entertainment. If you have some people over, video games are sometimes a good choice due to the varieties of games out there, such as dancing and instrumental games like “Rock 91nd”. With that said, they can also be a very risky hobby to let children have. Hours a day can become consumed in playing video games and the content that some games have can be bad for children of a certain age. I think that we need to find a medium. We need to censor the bad games from kids by until they grow up a little bit and become a certain age. I hope to take what I learned from my research and learn to control myself. Per ally, I believe that the producer of these violent games need to make sure that their product doesn’t get sold to kids under the appropriate age. I know plenty of people would probably disagree with me, but with the information that I found, I believe that violent video games and other forms of media can be bad for younger kids. Sources Cited Armand M. N icholi 11. et a1. "M-Rated Video Games and Aggressive or Problem Behavior Among Young Adolescents." Applied Developmental Science 13.4 (2009): 188—198. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 22 Mar. 2011. Ferguson, Christopher J ., and John Kilburn. "Much Ado About Nothing: The 'Misestimation and Overinterpretation of Violent Video Game Effects in Eastern and Western Nations: Comment on Anderson et a1. (2010)." Psychological 136.2 (2010): 174-178. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 22 I Mar. 2011. Greitemeyer, Tobias, and Silvia Osswald. "Effects of Prosocial Video Games on iProsocial Behavior. " Journal of Personality & Social Psychology 98.2 (2010): 211-221. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 22 Mar. 2011. "Violent video games and young people." Harvard Mental Health Letter 27.4 - (2010): 1-3. Academic Search Premier. EBSCO. Web. 22 Mar. 2011. ...
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