Albert Camus and Plato�s ideologies of Attitudes of Law and Justice

Albert Camus and Plato�s ideologies of Attitudes of Law and Justice

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Drew Langton A43369633 IAH 231 B Sec. 004 Albert Camus and Plato’s ideologies of Attitudes of Law and Justice Albert Camus’ The Stranger contains themes that are similar to themes in Plato’s The Trial and Death of Socrates , but the two works contain more contrasting ideas than similarities. Between the contrasting outlooks of the death sentence and the comparable ideas about the future, these works have surely caught my undivided attention. Plato presents Socrates in an especially humble manner after he has been sentenced to death. Socrates explains that he was “convicted because I lacked not words but boldness and shamelessness and the willingness to say to you what you would most gladly have heard from me,” (P. 40). Socrates chose not to do what was expected of him to avoid the possibility of a death sentence. Humbleness plays a large role in Socrates’ actions. When Socrates gets sentenced to death he is very much in control of his emotions. As an elderly man, he knew death would be coming soon for him either way, so the idea of dying doesn’t shock him as it may for a younger, less humble, or more immature man. The reason this is so important is that Socrates describes death from a completely different approach than what someone in today’s society would describe death as. He explains that death will be pleasant for him, and that he will enjoy going to the next world to get away from the unjust jurymen who have convicted him and sentenced him to death. This shows a lot about Socrates in a religious light. Based on his beliefs of the afterlife and how it has been depicted in his education, he has decided that death will be better than life because it is either one of two things: “Either the dead are nothing and have no perception of anything, or it is, as we are told, a change and a relocation for the
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Drew Langton A43369633 IAH 231 B Sec. 004 soul from here to another place,” (P. 41). This quote means that Plato doesn’t have the slightest suggestion that death could be bad. It could only be neutral, or it could be better than life. Looking at death as a blessing shows that people in Plato’s time were very
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Albert Camus and Plato�s ideologies of Attitudes of Law and Justice

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