Introduction_to_Animals

Introduction_to_Animals - called arachnids • Have two...

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Introduction to Animals CP Biology
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Comparison
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Evolution of Animals Animals most likely evolved from a group of protists.
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Characteristics of Kingdom Animalia But as diverse as they are, animals share four key characteristics that taken together separate them from other organisms. 1. Animals are eukaryotic. 2. Animal cells lack cell walls. 3. Animals are multicellular. 4. Animals are heterotrophs that ingest food
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Early Development The life cycles of most animals are also different from those of other organisms, especially in the early stages of development
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Other Characteristics -Protostome/Deuterostome -Symmetry
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Back to the Animal Kingdom
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Phylum Porifera Includes sponges
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Cnidarians Includes hydras coral, jellyfish and sea anemones
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Cnidarians Why vinegar?
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Phylum Platyhelminthes
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Life Cycle of some Flatworms
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Phylum Nematoda
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Arthropods-The largest group bodies, jointed appendages, and hard external skeletons
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Arachnids Scorpions, spiders, ticks, and mites and several smaller groups are collectively
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Unformatted text preview: called arachnids. • Have two body sections and four pairs of legs. • The two body sections are a fused head and thorax, called a cephalothorax and an abdomen. Decopods • Decapod meaning "ten legs" • Common examples include lobster, crab, and shrimp. • The "ten legs" refer to the pair of pincers (claws) and four pairs of walking legs that are characteristic of most decapods. • Decapods have two main body regions: a cephalothorax and abdomen Insects • Insects have three main body parts: head, thorax, and abdomen. • Three pairs of walking legs and usually one or two pairs of wings attached to the thorax. • Insect wings are extensions of the exoskeleton of the thorax. • Like spiders, insects have Malpighian tubules that serve in excretion. • Have an extensive tracheal system that transports gases throughout the body. • Insects typically have compound eyes, but they have just one pair of sensory antennae....
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Introduction_to_Animals - called arachnids • Have two...

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