Engr 101 Lab Report

Engr 101 Lab Report - Yeiser 1 THUMPER Lab Report Aubree...

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Yeiser 1 THUMPER THUMPER Lab Report Aubree Yeiser Group # 14 Engineering 101 3 December 2009
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2 Introduction The overall goal of this lab project is to create a Lego robot that can navigate a maze with no outside help. Building a Lego robot requires many steps, ideas, revisions, and compromises. There are three basic steps involved in any engineering project: design/planning, implementation, and problem solving. In order to build a Lego robot, one must sketch a design and create a general plan, put this plan into action by programming, wiring, and building the robot, and solve various problems along the way. The Lego robot is a group project, and therefore adds the aspect of teamwork into the overall intent. Not only must one think of ideas and solutions to problems involving the robot, but also take into consideration his or her teammates’ thoughts. Essentially, the Lego robot project not only produces a tangible robot in the end, but also develops teamwork skills necessary to be an engineer. Theory There were various mathematical and scientific theories used in the Lego Robot Lab, including current, resistance, voltage, Ohms law, analog verses digital, and parallel and series connections. Current is the flow of charged particles through a circuit element. The abbreviation for current is “I” and it is measured in amperes (abbreviated amps). Resistance is a measurement of the impedance over the segment, or two points, of a circuit. The resistance essentially slows down the current. Resistance is abbreviated “R” and is measured in ohms ( ). For the Lego robot, resistors (as shown in Figure A) were used to slow down the current going from the bumper to the breadboard. The voltage is
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Yeiser 3 the potential difference between two points. It is the entirety of the work done by an electric field. Ohms law states that the voltage is equal to the current times the resistance, or V=IR. Ohms law connects current, resistance, and voltage so that they can be calculated. Current is the flow of charged particles, or electrons, and can flow in different ways including a series connection and a parallel connection. When a circuit is in series the flow of the current goes through each element in the circuit (as shown in Figure B). When a circuit is in parallel the flow of the current is split through each element and divided depending on the number of branches (as shown in Figure C). There are also two different kinds of circuits: analog and digital. Analog circuits are time varying and carry out a continuous signal. As shown in Figure E, an analog circuit touches every point between characters. Digital circuits are discrete and have an “on or off” signal rather than flowing continuously. As shown in Figure D, a digital circuit switches from one character to the next without any movement in between. Along with the mathematical and scientific theories incorporated in this lab, there
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2011 for the course 2010 39550 taught by Professor Piterbarg during the Fall '10 term at USC.

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Engr 101 Lab Report - Yeiser 1 THUMPER Lab Report Aubree...

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