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Plant Layout and Piping

Plant Layout and Piping - 14‘s ExcerfJB 17m 5...

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Unformatted text preview: 14‘s ExcerfJB 17m: 5- Beuhcl‘ar‘ and Q ”we” r-ra mm M, was EXHIBIT 3-5 Sample Process Flow Diagram NAPHTHA I09“: ““265 memes - - IOI 2 1.3“} V REAL-rag FEE 5U2C=E 4W A v a .9 9.4%.? haw-P 750°? PLMP6 OVERHEAQ ° A AA 1‘ OF E i. ‘* GaNDEN§E2 - - Ibo°F '04'5 EFFLuENT m M —— la7-E 12' “L520. M FEED excumaesz J —————-———-§ ‘ r. 0 0,.- STEAM lol-T . lo3-E 5TZ‘EEEZ Wu 1-» --.-! 1 Drama “QM lam pm 41. Ioo°F o , - 104-7 ZEFLux " Fumes e m $441:qu MAKE -54? '09P? EevaEZ Dam —— — compeeébozs ‘ ‘ ETTOM? ‘OQ-E PROMT (eoLez ‘D‘J—MP’ 2 9°F ’ 120°E HAFH‘THA NAPHTHA HYDQéTIZEA‘rEFZ W‘" 41m NAPHTHA Process Plant Layout and Piping Design ”In“ V > 54 . A.” ., ,W‘nfiw EXHIBIT 3-32 Final Plot Plan Arrangement 1" _150‘-_O"/J_6;2€0 lo'.0" 5,,” WIDE A64865 WAY " IV- 2%! PzEUAILNG WIND . , t l PIPE. max g - I”: EL. II4—a‘ ...__ ff:- . II!“ In 00 104,150. l-l_|-| :3 ioa-D ..~-~'. III E; .mo-o k $LEEPEB$ loI-PA/ t . - " i 0 o. o. :R ISOI-O' cm: HEO LIGHT HEA NAPHTHA Hrozo‘rzaATee 57°“5 BAX/Jig “V'NC' PLANNING PLOT PLAN] ‘l'l‘... — _ — —— -_— ' Process Plant Layout and Piping Design 3o"): 425 8 .mm mm 2CD: 1...mam 7gge lnnfi TE.$V, IdUS Bbln [.1600 may eoe DMD QHHMHiiww Isometric View 14 121011131117- EXHIBIT 17-13 Example of a Component Interference Problem Computer-Aided Design -'Fx'xazewwiswzéisvygp gavrsfir : A. his“: :,;. ( a .r. 5‘4-emmnwf “14’2“”: Generally, drums are cylindrical hollow steel vessels used in process plants as intermediate containers that receive liquid from distillation and condensing equip- ment. Drums also collect liquid from vapor circuits and pump it to other process groups, disposal, or product storage. They are also used for chemical and catalyst storage, steam generation, and deaeration of boiler feed water. This chapter highlights the general requirements for drum plant layout and provides in- formation required to locate nozzles, instruments, piping, and controls for platforming and operator and maintenance access. TYPES OF DRUMS The drums discussed in this chapter are process unit drums that are used for refluxing, surge, Suction, and general liquid collection. Drums in these services can generally be divided into two categories: horizontally and vertically mounted. Drum internals are far less sophisticated than the components found inside the distillation tower and are limited to demister pads, baffles, vortex breakers, and distribution piping. Ex- hibit 5-1 shows a typical vertical compressor suction MAINTELI MC. M4599 CHAPTER Drums drum, and Exhibit 5-2 shows a horizontal reflux drum. When specified, steam drums and deaerators are usually furnished as a proprietary item. Layout is lim- ited to confirmation of nozzle and support locations to suit piping and structural configurations and platform— ing for operator and maintenance access. Exhibit 5-3 illustrates a typical deaerator arrangement. EXHIBIT 5-1 Typical Vertical Compressor Suction Drum me H Lucian: LEVEL Lavet MAINTENANCE ACLE66 INSTRUMENTS Llaulp au'r EXHIBIT 5-2 Typical Horizontal Reflux Drum LEVEL lue'rzumeu‘rg Liam!) ouT 91 gaps WIBIT 5-12 Drum Elevation Sketch uee Tm newt-no.4 109.990 \ gnaw-9' _ . _ I . senate“ ’2'0'100 shown in Exhibit 5-10. Horizontal drums are usually supported by saddles from concrete piers or steel frames if elevated within a structure, as illustrated in Exhibit 5—11. Leg-supported drums should not be used in reciprocating compressor circuits. The first step in drum layout is setting the height of the drum. To do this, the plant layout designer re- quires the following information: 0 Drum dimensions. 0 Type of heads. ' Support details. 0 NPSH requirements of pump. 0 Bottom outlet size. ' Minimum clearances. 0 Location. The centerline elevation of the drum, as illustrated in Exhibit 5-12, was set using the following listed infor- mation (it is recommended that a freehand sketch be used for this exercise): ' Drum dimensions—4—ft (1,220—mm) diameter by 10- ft (3,0SO-mm) length. ° Support details—Saddles and concrete piers. - NPSH—9 ft (2,700 mm). ' Bottom outlet—4 in. ° Location—Freestanding. 0 Minimum clearance—7 ft (2,100 mm). NOZZLE LOCATIONS Drum dimensions, nozzle sizes, and, if required, inter- nals are shown on the process vessel sketch furnished by process engineering and included in the process 95 EXHIBIT 5-13 Typical Process Vessel Sketch for a Horizontal Drum ll‘ m n S (x I“ OUT Quuo n4 th—llD OUT i i ‘it n n < ii I'l- s-reAM au-r MA|HT “~44! Acca IVEL < l 4 4 .— E E; f: release package. Exhibit 5-13, shows a typical process vessel sketch for a horizontal drum. The following information is required in order to position drum nozzles: ' Process vessel sketch. 0 Instrument vessel sketch. 0 Piping and instrumentation diagrams. ' Plant layout specification. ° Nozzle summary. ° Insulation requirements. O Plot plan. Exhibit 5-14 depicts the preferred nozzle locations for horizontal drums. The preferred location for level instruments is away from the turbulence at the liquid outlet nozzle. Al- though the vessel is provided with a vortex breaker, instruments should be set in the quiet zone of the vessel—for example, on the opposite side of the weir or baffle or near the vapor outlet end. Process nozzles should be located a minimum from the tangent line. Steam-out connections should be located at the end opposite the maintenance access and vent in the bot- Drums ...
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