MGMT 377 - Battle of Trafalgar The battle that changed me...

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Unformatted text preview: Battle of Trafalgar The battle that changed me world, and why hie British won the battle before it was fought Metaphors and Strategy 0 Easy to understand I Hard to forget 0 Scott McNeaIy, CEO of Sun Microsystems ‘ Said that he finds himself: “turning to metaphors and analogies, borrowmg images. from sports and even war to drive home my busmess strategy and motivate the troops. The companies mat succeed will be the ones that... employ great metaphors and analogies m define their business and tell their stuns." (Scum: swam-«an. Ii: Lil: 1va 2mm, mm B. Sh radel' "mime m i'izhlaa'zicnmpuunn'a’l saw, his cal-«mm law: 1 l-iws'wmnstiwn mm mwmr 1m new; womsz mm: m nl‘lom lieu M mm. ms; cm: Mummers nmnm mm On October 21, 1805, an English fleet commanded by Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson hunted down and annihilated the combined fleets of France and Spain in an immense sea battle off Cape Trafalgar, near the Spanish coast. The Battle of Trafalgar, as it came to be known, crowned the British Royal Navy as the undisputed sovereign of the world's oceans and confounded Napoleon's last hope of a crossed~Channel invasion of England. some Sitmmhwlvwl Napoleon's Europe Brian and France fought each other mrougnoutme entire 18‘" Century 14 Napoleon Bonaparte “ In all my piansI have always been thwarted by the British Fleet." (Napoleon kept a bust of Nelson in his study) ' General by age 24 0 Command of entire French Army by age 25 0 Emperor by age 30 "Bumpsnehas one" maderisnoastnut ouriieawouiahewam an! m tuning theses and tlmhswaslnqmlnwderamlmusmgbymyingmpon;mmhehnds.[l’am,if Em . harmuum,mnisue¢ismusmmnanmurmurs-none .. HM 1/19/2010 1/19/2010 Admiral Horatio Nelson - The mg »: Nonnii’abie Horallo um Nelson of the we Knight at In! Mom «incurable om: m lhe 5am Duke of Emma ir SiCI‘y, Knight alllie Grand Cross oi the Order of SI :EVfllnii’Vd and al' Meiit and or he ‘mpeiiai Tu'k‘ah Olde! 0' in: C'escem, Vice- Aamirai in me Fl!!! oi his Erna-mo vaiesry HE was also 5 Damn Earl anc VlSCDLM Captain by age :0 13m oeieaica Dangl- 2i see no signal neieaiea Flen cn— Battle oi in: Nil! iac: Placed n charge m Mediterranean Fleet i ““‘ <,_L‘7“‘_ \‘ French/Spanish had a six-snip soil-gun amiantage a but British possessed other advantages. —Nelson once said: Frigates are the eyes of the fleet’ Tendencies: British vs. French The British battle plan: ‘ ' ' ' — I British: 0 Fre ch ’ Take the ln‘tlatnle. eagerly engage the enemy — Variety ofan‘ark techniqugbased r lonventiunalatmcl- ""8 up and 0 Clear goal» establish naval supremacy/ defend animation firer “(may the homeland I ’ magnesia" - Environmental threat- Napoleon : gmflmm * g'gfiéfinfinggewinuiwlwas 0 Use maneuverability of ships to counter French - Minuet witsz was mink me - "mm hams, mu hem . . . . . , enemy in: main gmup strength — better posmoning of British ships . if:an mmmmm r wniwkshms, my: nine. _ ‘ signa comrmmm 7 2 w victory was 0 Use raking tactics Humane-Iver, wtnnfimenfinv ulasting. rcanncii » 7 {Na Im 0 Be adaptable if French make for open water, vfwflmi‘i'n’nmfiflé {mmamsi WW7" take out the lead ships; if they form for battle, ’ mmgfifig’mm‘xdf ’ attack in vertical columns fimfl‘nnm “89L authority “mm was mmm “Our country WI", I believe, sooner lorgive an nmcer for attacking an Enemy than Mr letting It alme,’ HN “First gain the victory and men maloe the best useom you can." NN Personnel: British vs. French - Seafanrig heritage — Island ' Superior Seamanship and setting, importance ofsaa gunnery — British ul'lS were ‘ N50 Very courageous made in Edwin, amactivems small but gogd sailors _ Combined forces or seagomg career could fire faster With more _ Training ~ many Sailors graded Mum (fired even 90 Spanish pressed into early, apprenticeships] W5 compared to five men—1.3m marine minutes for French/Spanish) Naval lEderShip — promotions ' A winning tradition — past 0 British . French and Spanish — Courageous — Started careers early — Nelson was at sea since the age of 12 service — Values — Leaders newly — Training appointed partially based on successes, mmmun cumin: i eager for battle Superiative leadership — Nelson — expertise, skills, genius, bravery, example ' . perforrnance/ not merely — Leadership and ‘ V'I'ene‘JVe had been appoinh'l'iem or anCStry, assignments based on defeaCEd before by experience and continuity merit Nelson 'Rixollect that you must be a seaan to be an officer and also that you cannot be a good ofictr wmoumeing a gentleman” HM “In honour I gained them, and In hlJrIDuV I will die With them” HN —-————————' 1/19/2010 More of the Royal Navy’s competitive advantages: - A British crew could tack change direction) in five minutes compared to 15 minutes rFrerich - Ilgrrtshh used new tedrnology of fiinflock firing vs. goose quill for {ENC - British had better gun powder and propellant O Carronade — sometimes Fired two or three balls “1 first round O Strategy: 7 Seize the initiative 7 Bolus: measures are the safst A Aggregrue combat doctrine — Accepted uncertainty 7 Nelson on lead ship “fime is everything; five minutes make the difference between Victory and defeat." HN Collingwood was probahly the most skillful admiral In the world at file time of Dame. He was the first to engage at Trafalgar was ahead of the other British ships by at least 400 yards. Once my to heme of Trafalgar he deieated a detachment 01 sixteen French Ships with a squadron Of four British vessels A very close friend of Nelson's Trained over some sailors during in; wear! Histonansmen credit Collingwood with the defeat of Napoleon — because after Trafalgar Collingwood ‘Let us do almost singlenandediy kept the French out 01 the something today Media,“an Other advantages: fPositioning - bottled Frerirlr and Spanish in Cadiz. Had wind in their EVOr. Timing — Nelson rnovm individual ships to take advantage of capabrlrties— used speed of frigatfi to relay information on enemy (competitors) Changed the I’Llifi of traditional broadside engagemait 7 raking and grapshot tactiG Leadership» Nelson placed his own ship, the HMS Victory at the front of the battle ' WIIH%WWdi Nelson's second in command was an excellent leader as we I 7 He wrote a well7received paper for the Royal Navy dealing with predlcurig the weather based on ocean current arid waves - Was first to engage at Trafalgar “I have always been a quarter of an hour before my time and It has mm men we.” HN Collingwood — a major resource Believed that training mm the key in victory. Believed training was more important In securing discldine than punishment — He hated flogging 7 he did nut use profanity - 'Mo swearing no warming m mllyim’ 7 Wed naval doctrine that flogging represemed a rairure or management by (as — Promoted doctme oi Brian for all on ship Was the first naval Waco keep a iog pi Instances at punishment aboard ship. Believed gunnery was as! panacea at 53 and that accurate dunmry was a lie; to smss — He panama imam awards: - ii good my arrive was once every Mmlrumas, e Golllngwoud's am could fire three unis in 3.5 iii-nuts! w m'glfff M“ “Tu naive Ihe best useof all or: powers via body of men iUS may the officers should h RH. iuiaw the chances and aniline 01 their people, and that me people should feel an erea attachment W “lair officers, which can only exit NM mum some EM mm." A A...L Collingwood — a master of competitive intelligence - British navy invented use of numerical flags and signaling in battle - Collingwood was an advocate of naval doctrine of using frigates for intelligence gathering — Used friganes after Trafalgar to gather informahon to keep French out of Italy, Portugal and Africa. — Use special envoys (spies) to gather intelligence I Once scared off a detachment of 26 French ships with four of his own, by appearing to sail as if expecting reinforcements! Collingwood — a master of speed "Collingwood trained the crew of his ship Excellent to such a pitch that they could fire an extraordinary three Droadsldes in mreeani} a-half minutes. It would never be battered and it would prove devastating to the enemy.” (M. Adams) He was able to sail his ships Mr — his column at Trafalgar was the fastest Admired Nelsons quest for speed 7 Heonce said of Nelson: ‘An enemy that commits a false step in ms View Is ruined, and it comes on him with an rrnpemosity that allows him no urns to recover! Was extremely confident his ships and crews could not be beaten Believed the faster frigates were the‘eya and ears' of the fleet Used his frigates to confuse and disrupt the intentions of the enemy HMS Excellent 1/19/2010 I s Nelson’s leadership era e, aggraswc mhncis, I Fgance had three times he population of Great Britain in = ‘ 3%;ng "m’a’ 1 05 " _ Hafl much SUCCESS "I DVE‘WUUS - Twice the national product ' Engagement: with French . . w _ 0 More land, better army, and better colonies In West ‘ . "€31 owemrég‘tgé‘ walelllem Indies . pedurrned well I French politics were characterized by a centralized . ‘ ' ' Wasa good Strategin bureaucracy and heavy regulation ' A remarkably modem man . , v Shaman/every man I Lucas — French captain of Redoubcable gave Victory a , _ 7 Phnnlngwllha "all very toth fight ' . $112.0 flarisDEEflly wnmunmr : — But heavler ammunimm and mnnnn of French were more » Was a masmr Dream ' difficult to handle at sea 7 . manure where he mu seize - And French lacked operatiunal tempo 1“ e The French: “My (hammer and good name are In my own leepmg, Lil: wlth disgrace is dreadful. A glorious death 45 to beenvied.” HN Nelson’s Notes: . ’ i : Dem-Erik MEWS NW"? “Slime "EMS- ““ “It is warm work; and mls day may be the Issue any mus at a "mm. But mark our [would not be elsewhere for thousands." HM “England expects that every man will do his duty.” HN mum-a mum in in: ME! “No Cami“ can do very wrong if he pleas his ship alongsiae that or rm f' HN . 1.4» r s. Nelsons ship-drthe-llne Victury had 100 guns With EDD sailors - the Captain was Thomas Hardy Raking maneuver: (sometimes referred lo as ‘rolllng broadside) Step 1: all guns fire at one level almed ‘afl’ at enemy sma Step 2: Dull along broadsme, Engage at will Shim-mine mm a Frugal! - sum: Mp:j/www.ginhabecunlynig/mllmry/sysumslship/SaIHJItIII Regular snot. quulmd gmneshot, bar-shut and mam-shot, Bumpy Carma Iron Company in Samaria ‘l cannm, inam inmefieid nrglory. be keptoumf slgnl: wherever there 5 anything no he dune, there Prim/idem: lS suretu direct my Reps,” HN Outcomes Nelson muflggmmm “Md 2500 I Irnrllcally.itwaslhe - wows. mm. 1200mm French strategy of placing 5mm m in battle = w snarpsnomars In [he ' T “.7mm‘fmwfim yards rigging, and craw's negls Lhal led to heavy . mama. Md mun h - cue—suWMU’v-l 'm ossuallie!» but madeii possrble for mom in . Mmmunmsmsnmwimm hmxgwflmllnmhdmaml alimlnalz Admiral Nelson v mm mm m i 0 Nelson died at the momenl Calumet: * Pram ha Zn Elm-WWW, Winn": W at his greatest triumph » Died a 4:30 In: anamnun Nelsunwas mum by a mmmsmlrom a mum mlper Vlllt nun: 51mm am am smnly trauma in Pram: 1mm "wenth British leswas alminatm or me bani: at age 47 Napalaufl’s WU :fim In Eumpe WI dull I mppllng blow 'The business of the English commander-mime Delna first in bring an enemy fleet to Dame on the mast advaniagews terms m himself. (1 nun rhataf laying nls ships close on board me enemy, as aneumuusly as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the businas is derided! HN “LEUVE alune: I have yatmyiegs andonearm.mlmcwrum1mmle haste wlm his lnslmmema 1mm I musth ughtamr wmemneirsafl the bener.”HN 1/19/2010 7 fifi_—_—1 1/19/2010 Lessons of Trafalgar (Competitive strategy topics from Mgt. 377] French and Spanish mistakes - Mixed the fleet and commanders j 2:: f; ifvglsolufirggysmgmmmm) 0 Failed to take advantage of newer bigger guns - mat in training (core oompemntls) and ships ~ built new 5 ips to fight previous - Nmrumeresnmmme enemrwse campe‘lllveintelligence) battles 2 Elfifilfmfimmflfiiélfilfl‘lté‘SSS’SflSllméeome) A VillenEuve was on the largest batdeshi in the world 7 Allows amulelotakemitiatwe at the time— the 13B-gun Sann'ssma rinr'dad Ar ftm‘flfileTakvfirgengmtgwEn . . - nayze an i ° Villeneuve was tentatwe- had already been . 1mm meme strategies change m: rula (come «mm; beaten once by Nelson at battle of the Nile - Eran aWaflmgeo:sllndusW) Wltlun(g:r:>(cst1m£a . , - Eon mmmunlca lon and timing among uni urruerua mmpeuuon) ' Had more Shlpsfiw me“ bUt W‘thheld many - Accentuateorganlzation‘sheritage and Lulturefiorecompetentlfi) resources from mutual battle . Us: new mnnuiogynutvmmzmeiims of phvsmalresnuvces (advantage through people] Use your mommy as leverage agalnrst larger rue ()udo suamgy) aplollintallulhle wul’cfi (am/image thruugh pewle) Don't fightfll: last warv wage the “EX! one' (comp!!! For Mme) “Gentlemen, when the enemy I5 comrmttee to a mistake we must not interrupt him Loo soon." HN Competitive lessons learned by United States I US builds navy to defeat pirates in Mediterranean in late 17005. - Needed a type of ship to counteract both shlpvof-the-line and frigates. — Big enough to overpower frigates - Fast enough to outmaneuver ships of line - Answer: USS Constitution ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/12/2011 for the course MGMT 377 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Iowa State.

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MGMT 377 - Battle of Trafalgar The battle that changed me...

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