CH 4 physical development PSYC 2076

CH 4 physical development PSYC 2076 -...

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Physical Development and Health Child Psychology Summer 2011
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Body Growth and Change Patterns of Growth During prenatal development and early infancy,  the  head  constitutes an extraordinarily large  portion of the total body. 
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Patterns of Growth Infancy The average North American newborn is 20  inches long and weighs 7½ pounds. Most newborns lose 5% to 7% of their body  weight in the first several days of life. Newborns double  their birth weight by the age  of 4 months and nearly triple  it by their first  birthday.
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Patterns of growth Early Childhood The percentage of increase in height and weight  decreases each additional year.  Body fat declines slowly but steadily during the  preschool years. Girls have more fatty  tissue than  boys; boys have more muscle  tissue. Growth patterns vary individually. Mostly due to heredity and environmental experiences.
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Patterns of Growth Middle and Late Childhood Slow, consistent growth averaging 2 to 3 inches a  year. Muscle mass and strength increase; “baby fat” 
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CH 4 physical development PSYC 2076 -...

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