L17_Single_phase_sys - Material and Energy Balances Single-Phase Systems CAB1064 Material and Energy Balances 1 Material and Energy Balances

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CAB1064 – Material and Energy Balances 1 Material and Energy Balances 10/11/11 Single-Phase Systems
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CAB1064 – Material and Energy Balances 2 Material and Energy Balances 10/11/11 Objectives At the end of this chapter, you should be able to do the following : The three ways of obtaining values of physical properties Ideal gases Equation of state
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CAB1064 – Material and Energy Balances 3 Material and Energy Balances 10/11/11 Introduction In (almost) all the problems that we have discussed, you were given all the information that you needed. Obviously, in real life, you will be required to get all the information you need by yourself. Problems rarely so easy: Need to determine various physical properties Need to derive additional relations among variables
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CAB1064 – Material and Energy Balances 4 Material and Energy Balances 10/11/11 Single-Phase Systems How (and why!) you might estimate the values of physical properties of process streams Determine the density of a mixture of liquids Use the ideal gas law to determine P, V, or T of a single component Determine the composition of a mixture of ideal gases from their partial pressures or volume fractions Use one (or all) of the non-ideal equations to determine P, V, or T Explain when each of the equations of state might be most useful Use equations of state for mixtures of gases Use equations of state in material balances
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CAB1064 – Material and Energy Balances 5 Material and Energy Balances 10/11/11 Physical properties Large number of physical properties are of interest Φ Density Φ Viscosity Φ Thermal conductivity Φ Specific heat Φ Latent heat of vaporisation Φ Vapour pressure Physical properties required to describe: Elements Compounds Mixtures
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CAB1064 – Material and Energy Balances 6 Material and Energy Balances 10/11/11 Methods of determining information required (e.g physical properties) Look it up - published results e.g. CRC Handbook of Chemistry and Physics, 79th Edition Estimate it - number of equations available Measure it - determine it experimentally
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CAB1064 – Material and Energy Balances 7 Material and Energy Balances 10/11/11 Liquid and Solid Densities Generally density is a function of temperature ~ decreases with heating, increases with pressure But for liquids or solids, densities are considered independent of temperature (with little error) and pressure Liquids and solids are approximately incompressible (you can use the density at one T and P for almost any other T and P )
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CAB1064 – Material and Energy Balances 8 Material and Energy Balances 10/11/11 Density of Liquid Mixtures There are two methods of determining density of a liquid
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This note was uploaded on 08/08/2009 for the course CHEMICAL 11189 taught by Professor Dr.azmi during the Spring '09 term at International University in Germany.

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L17_Single_phase_sys - Material and Energy Balances Single-Phase Systems CAB1064 Material and Energy Balances 1 Material and Energy Balances

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