7e Chapter 11 Part 1

7e Chapter 11 Part 1 - MSIS 2103 Chapter 11 Part 1 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–20. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
MSIS 2103 Chapter 11 – Part 1 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 11 Behind the Scenes: Databases and Information Systems
Background image of page 2
3 Chapter Topics Databases and their uses Database components Types of databases Database management systems Relational databases Data warehouses and data marts
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Today’s Challenge Managing the information we are collecting and storing If we can’t manage it, we can’t use it A successful business in today’s world needs to have a way of managing their information so that they can use it for better decision-making
Background image of page 4
Data and Information Data is raw numbers and/or text Information is numbers and/or text that have been organized so that they are meaningful Knowledge is information that is specifically related to a specific context through a person’s experience
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
You Are Impacted by Databases Every day! You are in databases for many companies Telephone Utility companies In many businesses where you have shopped using a credit card In many businesses where you have shopped
Background image of page 6
You Are Impacted by Databases Your cell phone is largely a database Your contacts Your ring tones Your music/audio Your calendar items All of this material is stored so that your
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Life Without Databases: Lists Lists are often sufficient for simple tasks Not appropriate for complex information Multiple lists lead to Data redundancy Data inconsistency Duplicate data 8
Background image of page 8
A List Approach
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A Database approach Class Table Author Table Purchase Table Author Add. Ph. ClsID Name Sem Ins
Background image of page 10
Keeping Multiple Lists Lots of redundant data – lots of storage required Think about updating: you have to change an item in every place it occurs What if you miss one place? Data inconsistency! What if an entry was accidentally made
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Life Without Databases: Lists 12
Background image of page 12
What is a Database? A collection of related data that is organized in such a way that it can be sorted and queried to produce various kinds of information It is centrally located and is used by multiple users at the same time
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
14 Advantages of Using Databases Store and retrieve large quantities of information Enable information sharing Provide data centralization Promote data
Background image of page 14
15 Disadvantages of Databases Complex to construct Time consuming Expensive Privacy concerns
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Databases Advantages far outweigh the disadvantages A company must have a functional database in order to remain on the same plane as its competitors
Background image of page 16
Types of Databases Relational - most common today
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Relational Databases The relational model was developed in 1970 by E. F. Codd Underlying the model is a body of mathematical principles derived from relational algebra, relational calculus, and set theory Because of this, the relational model is accurate, consistent, and robust
Background image of page 18
A Relational Database Data in the database is organized in relations A relation is also called a
Background image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 20
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/12/2011 for the course MSIS 2103 taught by Professor Dr.kletke during the Fall '08 term at Oklahoma State.

Page1 / 66

7e Chapter 11 Part 1 - MSIS 2103 Chapter 11 Part 1 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 20. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online