HST 203 Week 2 - HST203Week2 18/01/201110:10:00

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HST 203 Week 2 18/01/2011 10:10:00 Theme of the week: Nationalization, industrial capitalism, and the transformation  of postbellum society. Changing demographics and patterns of settlement 1860-1900 Native Americans in the west The railroads and economic and cultural transformations John Gast, American Progress New York in the top right hand corner Moving west Population, Native and Foreign-Born Shifts from Northern and Western Europe immigrants to Eastern and  Southern European immigrants US in 1861 23 free states and 11 slave states Settling the West Three significant acts of Congress in 1862: o Morrill Land Grant College Act o Homestead Act An inducement to individual settlers to move west If you get the land and can prove that you’re properly settling  the land, in 5 years you own the land. o Pacific Railway Act Charters two corporations to connect the east to the west with  the transcontential railroad. (completed in 1869)
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Changing demographics, 1860 to 1900 1860 population: 31.4 million (mostly rural) 1900 population: 76.2 million 1860: 80% live in a rural area, 50% self employed 1900: 60% live in a rural area, 30% self employed in 1860, only three cities had more than 250,000 people (New York,  Philadelphia, Brooklyn) in 1900, eleven cities had more than 250,000 people, and three had over a  million (New York, Phillie, Chi) Between 1860 and 1900, 40 million immigrants came to US The Multiethnic West 1860: two “Western” states by 1890, U.S. had added WS, ID, MT, WY, UT, NV, and CO Last two states of the “lower 48” were the Mexico border states of Arizona  and New Mexico (1912) Wesern U.S. culture great influenced by influx of immigrants from Mexico and  China 1882: Chinese Exclusion Act o they become the first people in American history to be excluded from  immigrating to the US because “they cannot assimilate” Native Americans and Western Settlement 1850s-1880s was a period of almost unceasing hostility between NAs and  whites on the western frontier a few million NAs lived on the western plains this took the form of both isolated skirmishes and major military confrontations June 25 and 26, 1867: Battle of Little Bighorn: General Custer’s troops vs. the  Sioux as lead by Crazy Horse o More that 200 US troops killed here
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o One part of a massive native resistance to federal laws Massive Native resistance to federal reservation policy Federal attempts at non-military coercion: o Educating children in English and converting to Protestantism
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2011 for the course HST 203 taught by Professor Stamm during the Spring '11 term at Michigan State University.

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HST 203 Week 2 - HST203Week2 18/01/201110:10:00

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