lesson+7 - Lesson 7 In the last lesson, we drew pretty...

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Unformatted text preview: Lesson 7 In the last lesson, we drew pretty pictures about data, pictures which had quite a bit of meaning for us in how the data were shaped. In this lecture, we move to a discussion of describing data through the use of numbers. Were going to talk a bit about measures of central tendency. Some of the measures are very familiar to most of you (the mean, the median, the mode); however, two may be less familiar (the harmonic mean and the geometric mean). The mode is a measure of central tendency describing the most commonly occurring data point (and may or may not exist) . If it does exist, a mode can be calculated on any type of data type, nominal, ordinal, interval, or ratio. For example, lets say we are interested in gender in a class. We have 50 females and 40 males. Our mode (most occurring value) would be 50, the number of females. Clearly, these data are nominal. If we are interested in the number of 1 st , 2d, and 3d place finishes by an athlete and the associated values are 10, 20, and 5, then the mode...
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2011 for the course QMST 2333 taught by Professor Mendez during the Spring '08 term at Texas State.

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lesson+7 - Lesson 7 In the last lesson, we drew pretty...

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