epictetus - journal2

epictetus - journal2 - The Enchiridion speaks of daily...

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Unformatted text preview: The Enchiridion speaks of daily principles and methods which one should lead his life by. There are certain rules which if one follows will have a peaceful life and a life full of rules. They are not part of any religion but are just philosophical thoughts irrespective of religion. They are highly based on that of Socrates and Zeno, two great philosophers of that time. Although, Zeno was before Socrates, he was from Southern Italy. In this writing, Epictetus says that men’s ultimate goal is toward the state. He should be loyal to the state. In his writing, - “Consider when, on a voyage, your ship is anchored; if you go on shore to get water you may along the way amuse yourself with picking up a shellish, or an onion. However, your thoughts and continual attention ought to be bent towards the ship, waiting for the captain to call on board; you must then immediately leave all these things, otherwise you will be thrown into the ship, bound next and feel like a sheep. So it is with life. If, instead on a will be thrown into the ship, bound next and feel like a sheep....
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This note was uploaded on 10/14/2011 for the course UGC 111 taught by Professor Bono during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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epictetus - journal2 - The Enchiridion speaks of daily...

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