AST-L24-ch1819__3

AST-L24-ch1819_3 - final exam Today we will discuss Cosmology and the Big Bang Wednesday we will finish the Big Bang have a short discussion of

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1 final exam!!! Today we will discuss Cosmology and the Big Bang Wednesday we will finish the Big Bang, have a short discussion of Life in the Universe, and review for the final exam Remember: “the Great Wall” Earth Virgo Cluster Expanding Universe L ook i ng at an empty pat c h of s ky AST 1002 Planets, Stars and Galaxies 1) Hubble’s Law 2) Expanding Universe 3) Cosmology Assumptions 4) The Origin of the Universe “the Big Bang” 5) Fate of the Universe Very little gas and dust significant gas and dust some gas and dust Review No new star formation!! significant new star formation!! new star formation small, irregular, no rotation fast rotation slow rotation Pop II Pop I
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2 Measuring Distances Stereoscopic viewing ( Parallax ) only “small” distances nearest few thousand stars in our galaxy “Standard candles” objects which have known luminosities Cepheid variables variation tells luminosity – good to 65-100 million LY brightest stars in galaxy, size of HII regions , overall brightness of galaxy – good in steps out to 1-2 billion LY Type Ia supernova all have same luminosity good to 8-10 billion LY Relies on Comparison to examples of the same type objects in nearby galaxies Galactic Redshifts Edwin Hubble (1889-1953) and colleagues measured the spectra (light) of many galaxies found nearly all galaxies are red-shifted Redshift ( Z ) From Ch. 2, (Doppler effect) Z = v/c (for speeds aproaching c , we’ll need a relativistic version of this equation. rest rest λ λ λ - = observed Z Andromeda galaxy Hubble’s Law Hubble found the amount of redshift depended upon the distance the farther away , the greater the redshift v = H 0 x d What is H 0 ? Hubble’s data distance to galaxy Recessional velocity
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3 Bigger Structure Structure bigger than galaxies Galaxy groups 2-30 galaxies Local Group – contains the Milky Way Galaxy clusters 100s of galaxies – Virgo Cluster (rich cluster) Superclusters groups and clusters combined The Universe is filled with
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This note was uploaded on 10/13/2011 for the course AST 1002 taught by Professor Gerstein during the Spring '08 term at FSU.

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AST-L24-ch1819_3 - final exam Today we will discuss Cosmology and the Big Bang Wednesday we will finish the Big Bang have a short discussion of

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