Section 2.5 - Section 2.5 Variation Variation describes how...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Section 2.5 Variation Variation describes how one quantity varies (changes) in a proportional relationship with another quantity. Quantities my vary directly, inversely, jointly or with combined variation. k = the constant of variation or proportionality. (n may equal 1, x = x 1 .) In most variation questions, x and y are known for one case. Find k, then write a formula to use for all cases. Direct Variation – both quantities or up or both quantities go down. For example: As the number of miles driven increases, the more fuel is used. Another example: As the speed of a car increases, stopping distance required increases. Direct Variation Formula If y varies directly with x n , then y = kx n . Suppose y varies directly as the cube of x. If y = 4 when x = 2, what is the value of y when x = 4? You may also use a proportion to solve direct variation questions. Indirect or Inverse Variation inverse (or indirect) variation - as one quantity increases, the other decreases For example: As distance between objects increases the force of gravity between decreases. Inverse Variation Formula
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/12/2011 for the course MATH 1513 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Oklahoma State.

Page1 / 2

Section 2.5 - Section 2.5 Variation Variation describes how...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online