CH 10 part 1 Emotional Development

CH 10 part 1 Emotional Development - EmotionalDevelopment...

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Emotional Development Child Psychology Summer 2011
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Exploring emotions What are emotions? An emotion is a feeling, or affect, that occurs when a person is  in a state or an interaction that is important to him or her,  especially to his or her well-being Almost all classifications designate an emotion as either  positive or negative. Positive : include enthusiasm,  joy, and love Negative : include anxiety, anger, guilt, and sadness
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Exploring Emotions Emotions are linked with early developing  regions of the human nervous system, including  structures of the limbic system and the brain  stem. The capacity of infants to show distress,  excitement, and rage reflects the early emergence  of these  biologically  rooted emotional brain  systems. Cultural variations reveal the role of  experience   in emotion.
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Exploring Emotions Emotional Competence Focuses on the adaptive nature of emotional  experience.  Becoming emotionally competent involves  developing a number of skills in social contexts.
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Emotional Competence Skills
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Development of Emotion Two types of early emotions (proposed by Michael  Lewis) Primary emotions Are present in humans and animals Appear in the first six months of the human infant’s  development.  Include surprise, interest, joy, anger, sadness, fear, and  disgust. Self-conscious emotions Require self-awareness that involves consciousness and  a sense of “me.”  Occurs for the first time at some point in the second 
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Emotional Expressions and Social  Relationships The ability of infants to communicate emotions           
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CH 10 part 1 Emotional Development - EmotionalDevelopment...

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