Hobbes - Socialcontracttheory HobbesLeviathan,pp. 182188

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Social contract theory Hobbes’ Leviathan, pp.  182 – 188
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
So this is where we begin our foray into  Normative Ethics .  We’re leaving behind all that  business about the  nature  of  right/wrong/good/bad/obligation/ duty/etc.  (metaethics).   And we’re replacing it with talk about  arriving  at moral standards that regulate right and wrong  conduct . In other words, we’re looking now at moral 
Background image of page 2
In particular, we’re going to look at a particular kind of  ethical theory: Social Contract Theory :  the view that morality is  founded solely on uniform social agreements that serve  the best interests of those who make the agreement. Or, to put it in other words, you know what counts as  right and wrong behavior by looking at the ‘social  contract’.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Before getting on to the bit about contracts, we need to  know what kind of situation we’re all in initially.   Depending on what that situation is like, we’ll get  different agreements.   1 Initial state from where  all the bargaining occurs           2 The stuff we end up  agreeing to.
Background image of page 4
To begin with, Hobbes actually thinks that nature has made  people pretty much  equal  with respect to intelligence and  strength. “For as to the strength of body, the weakest has strength  enough to kill the strongest, wither by secret machination  or by confederacy with others that are in the same danger  with himself” “As to the faculties of the mind . . . I find yet a greater  equality among men than that of strength.  For prudence is  but experience, which equal time equally bestows on all  men in those things they equally apply themselves to.”
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Now, “from this equality of ability arises equality of  hope in the attaining of our ends”. In other words, if there is something that we all want,  then there’s going to be some serious fighting for it.   Our equal ability at getting (food, shelter, clothing, etc.)  means we’re going to be in a constant fight to get ours.
Background image of page 6
So what we find are  3 causes of quarrel . (1) Competition (2) Diffidence (distrust) (3) Glory
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
“The first (competition) makes men invade for gain.”   Here we “use violence to make [ourselves] masters of  other men’s persons, wives, children, and cattle”, etc. There’s competition because we have to get the things  we need in order to survive and there are lots of other  people who need those things, too.
Background image of page 8
“The second (diffidence) [is] for safety”.  We use it to  defend  our persons, wives, children, and cattle, etc. In other words, we learn to be real worried about 
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 10
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/14/2011 for the course PHIL 2103 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Arkansas.

Page1 / 28

Hobbes - Socialcontracttheory HobbesLeviathan,pp. 182188

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online