ap07_englang_formb_q1

ap07_englang_formb_q1 - AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 1 The score should reflect a judgment of the essay’s quality as a whole. Remember that students had only 15 minutes to read and 40 minutes to write. Therefore, the paper is not a finished product and should not be judged by standards that are appropriate for an out-of-class assignment. Evaluate the essay as a draft, making certain that you reward students for what they do well. All essays, even those scored 8 or 9, may contain occasional flaws in analysis, prose style, or mechanics. Such features should enter into the holistic evaluation of an essay’s overall quality. In no case may an essay with many distracting errors in grammar and mechanics be scored higher than a 2. 9 8 Essays earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for those that are scored an 8 and, in addition, are especially sophisticated in their argument and synthesis of sources, or impressive in their control of language. Effective Essays earning a score of 8 effectively develop a position about the most important considerations facing the person responsible for securing a new work of art or an artifact for a museum. They support their position by effectively synthesizing * at least three of the sources. The argument is convincing, and the sources effectively support the student’s position. The prose demonstrates an ability to control a wide range of the elements of effective writing but is not necessarily flawless. 7 6 Essays earning a score of 7 fit the description of those that are scored a 6 but are distinguished by more complete or more purposeful argumentation and synthesis of sources, or a more mature prose style. Adequate Essays earning a score of 6 adequately develop a position about the most important considerations facing the person responsible for securing a new work of art or an artifact for a museum. They synthesize at least three of the sources. The argument is generally convincing, and the sources generally support the student’s position, but the argument is less developed or less cogent than the arguments of essays earning higher scores. The language may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear. 5 Essays earning a score of 5 develop a position about the most important considerations facing the person responsible for securing a new work of art or an artifact for a museum. They support their position by synthesizing at least three sources, but their arguments and their use of sources are somewhat limited, inconsistent, or uneven. The argument is generally clear, and the sources generally support the student’s position, but the links between the sources and the argument may be strained. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but it usually conveys the student’s ideas adequately. * For the purposes of scoring, synthesis refers to combining the sources and the student’s position to form a cohesive, supported argument, as well as accurately citing sources. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 1 (continued) 4 Inadequate Essays earning a score of 4 inadequately develop a position about the most important considerations facing the person responsible for securing a new work of art or an artifact for a museum. They attempt to present an argument and support their position by synthesizing at least two sources but may misunderstand, misrepresent, or oversimplify either their own argument or the sources they include. The link between the argument and the sources is weak. The prose of essays scored a 4 may suggest immature control of writing. 3 2 Essays earning a score of 3 meet the criteria for a score of 4 but demonstrate less understanding of the sources, less success in developing their own position, or less control of writing. Little Success Essays earning a score of 2 demonstrate little success in developing a position about the most important considerations facing the person responsible for securing a new work of art or an artifact for a museum. They may merely allude to knowledge gained from reading the sources rather than citing the sources themselves. These essays may misread the sources, fail to present an argument, or substitute a simpler task by merely responding to the question tangentially or by simply summarizing the sources. The prose of essays scored a 2 often demonstrates consistent weaknesses in writing, such as a lack of development or organization, grammatical problems, or a lack of control. 1 Papers earning a score of 1 meet the criteria for a score of 2 but are especially simplistic, are weak in their control of writing, or do not cite even one source. 0 Indicates an on-topic response that receives no credit, such as one that merely repeats the prompt. — Indicates a blank response or one that is completely off topic. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING COMMENTARY (Form B) Question 1 Sample: 1A Score: 9 This is a superb piece, exemplifying a genuine argumentative essay, in contrast to an examination answer. In fact, this essay can be read independent of the prompt. It introduces a subject that is, or ought to be, of concern to educated adults and leads its readers through the development of a strong central thesis about this topic, all the while incorporating (literally embodying) points from the secondary sources into the body of the response. The essay begins by evoking a scene and a mood familiar to anyone who has ever visited a museum and in so doing introduces two values that the central claim will involve: “steadfast tradition and reverence for education, truth, and rememberance [sic].” The student then boldly asserts: “There is no justification for a museum to destroy these values by commercializing itself.” The second paragraph begins to develop this contention, arguing that “Money is secondary to the goal of the museum.” This paragraph effectively incorporates material from sources, employing two different citation methods: one using parenthetical attribution and the other introducing the source name in the first sentence of its treatment. Both methods are acceptable. The third paragraph uses a transitional word, “Indeed,” both to build on the previous material and to introduce the new point that “sometimes profits and sociopolitical ideals are mutually exclusive.” Here, the student offers an extended discussion of Source B. The recommendation about the most important considerations in choosing works of art or artifacts for a museum is presented candidly at the beginning of the fourth paragraph. Notice how the student skillfully uses the material about Colonial Williamsburg from Source E not to affirm the recommendation but to serve as a counterexample to it. The piece concludes with a wonderful ending, distinguishing “fantasy” from “education, philosophy, and cultural understanding,” and then urging museums to “stay true to their original cause.” The combination of strong argumentation, clear voice, and sophisticated organization and diction place this essay at the very top of the score range. Sample: 1B Score: 6 This essay begins with a broad-stroke, highly general perspective on the topic at hand before stating its central claim—that “only the artifacts that accurately describe the past be selected to show and tell their stories.” The essay then mentions a discussion that museum directors should have on the purpose of showing artifacts and the effect of their placement. After a momentary mention of Picasso, the student moves to synthesize the material from Source C in support of the claim that “the one in charge consider the message the museum seeks to convey to the public.” Next the essay develops the point that museum directors should take into account not only what artifacts get displayed but also how they are shown. This point, however, gets relatively short shrift as the student moves on to consider the financial exigencies of a museum and to offer a brief consideration of Source A. The student concludes, however, by returning to the central claim and rehearsing the critique of authenticity offered by Source E. This essay is quite adequate: demonstrating a clear prose style, the student states and develops a position and, although overlooking some nuances in the source material, treats three sources dutifully. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING COMMENTARY (Form B) Question 1 (continued) Sample: 1C Score: 3 This essay inadequately addresses the prompt. Rather than developing a position, it briefly considers several and offers rather slim consideration of each of them. It begins by attempting to develop a position about finances. After mentioning material from Source A, the student notes that “Nobody would want to see a messy museum” and “Artifacts are not cheap.” After narrating a personal example about visiting a museum gift shop and mentioning Source D, the student next argues that “money isn’t the only factor.” Asserting that the “theme of the artifact is relevent [sic] too,” the student offers the relatively simplistic example that “Viking themes need Viking artifacts, not Indian ones, and so on and so forth,” before examining the material from Source C and then noting that “Nobody wants to see something from the middle ages [sic] in an Indian scene.” The student concludes simply that “It takes a lot of thought in obtaining certain artifacts for a museum.” The combination of simplistic development, deviation from focus, and relatively unsophisticated organization and diction place this essay at the low end of the inadequate range. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2009 for the course OC 9876 taught by Professor Dq during the Spring '09 term at UC Merced.

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