ap07_englang_formb_q2

ap07_englang_formb_q2 - AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 2 The score should reflect a judgment of the essay’s quality as a whole. Remember that students had only 40 minutes to read and write; therefore, the essay is not a finished product and should not be judged by standards appropriate for an out-of-class assignment. Evaluate the essay as a draft, making certain to reward students for what they do well. All essays, even those scored 8 or 9, may contain occasional flaws in analysis, prose style, or mechanics. Such features should enter into the holistic evaluation of an essay’s overall quality. In no case may an essay with many distracting errors in grammar and mechanics be scored higher than a 2. 9 8 Essays earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for those that are scored an 8 and, in addition, are especially sophisticated in their explanation and argument or demonstrate particularly impressive control of language. Effective Essays earning a score of 8 effectively take a position on Mitford’s view of the term “muckraker.” The evidence used is appropriate and convincing. The prose demonstrates an ability to control a wide range of the elements of effective writing but is not necessarily flawless. 7 6 Essays earning a score of 7 fit the description of those that are scored a 6 but provide a more complete argument or demonstrate a more mature prose style. Adequate Essays earning a score of 6 adequately take a position on Mitford’s view of the term “muckraker.” The evidence used is appropriate. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear. 5 4 Essays earning a score of 5 take a position on Mitford’s view of the term “muckraker.” These essays may, however, provide uneven, inconsistent, or limited explanations or evidence. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but it usually conveys the student’s ideas. Inadequate Essays earning a score of 4 inadequately take a position on Mitford’s view of the term “muckraker.” The evidence used may be insufficient. The prose generally conveys the student’s ideas but may suggest immature control of writing. 3 Essays earning a score of 3 meet the criteria for a score of 4 but demonstrate less success in taking a position on Mitford’s view of the term “muckraker” or in providing evidence to support that position. The essays may show less control of writing. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 2 (continued) 2 Little Success Essays earning a score of 2 demonstrate little success in taking a position on Mitford’s view of the term “muckraker.” These essays may misunderstand the prompt or substitute a simpler task by responding to the prompt tangentially with unrelated, inaccurate, or inappropriate evidence. The prose often demonstrates consistent weaknesses in writing. 1 Essays earning a score of 1 meet the criteria for a score of 2 but are undeveloped, especially simplistic in their explanation and argument, or weak in their control of language. 0 Indicates an on-topic response that receives no credit, such as one that merely repeats the prompt. — Indicates a blank response or one that is completely off topic. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING COMMENTARY (Form B) Question 2 Sample: 2A Score: 8 This essay develops a clear position through use of contrasting examples and arguments. The piece begins by alluding to the prompt and showing that, indeed, the word “muckraker” originated in a time when journalists moved beyond reporting and toward controlling national events. The student then turns to the examples of Watergate and Vietnam, arguing that in both of these instances journalists shed light on situations that needed to be seen by the public. Finally, the student argues that muckraking can be positive when the situation requires extreme measures on the part of reporters. The essay is not without minor errors, but the prose style is solid and clear so that the reader can follow the student’s arguments with ease. Sample: 2B Score: 5 This essay is uneven in its development of a position on muckraking. The student nods to the problems with muckraking but then turns to an admired author, Ida Tarbell, whose investigation of John D. Rockefeller led to a balanced view of Rockefeller’s life. The example provides an interesting illustration of what good reporting can do, but then the essay takes a turn that does not follow from the illustration. The student begins to discuss “negative side effects” and loses the thread of the development of a position. The conclusion neither defends nor decries muckraking and leaves the reader somewhat perplexed as to the student’s position. The writing in the essay is itself uneven—sometimes even and clear, sometimes wandering and loosely connected. Sample: 2C Score: 2 This essay demonstrates little success in developing a position. Substituting a simpler task, the student merely describes some of the difficulties that journalists face in their work. The essay then takes a turn toward a personal example of family members who are journalists and who work hard at their jobs. The example discusses the travails of journalists without noting whether their reporting should or should not look for the darker side of the news. The writing in this essay lacks clarity and continuity, leaving the reader to endeavor to connect the sentences. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ...
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