ap07_englang_op_q1

ap07_englang_op_q1 - AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 1 The score should reflect a judgment of the essay’s quality as a whole. Remember that students had only 15 minutes to read and 40 minutes to write; therefore, the essay is not a finished product and should not be judged by standards that are appropriate for an out-of-class assignment. Evaluate the essay as a draft, making certain to reward students for what they do well. All essays, even those scored 8 or 9, may contain occasional flaws in analysis, prose style, or mechanics. Such features should enter into the holistic evaluation of an essay’s overall quality. In no case may an essay with many distracting errors in grammar and mechanics be scored higher than a 2. 9 8 Essays earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for 8 essays and, in addition, are especially sophisticated in their argument, skillful in their synthesis of sources, or impressive in their control of language. Effective Essays earning a score of 8 effectively develop a position on the effects of advertising. They support the position by successfully synthesizing* at least three of the sources. The argument is convincing, and the sources effectively support the student’s position. The prose demonstrates an ability to control a wide range of the elements of effective writing but is not necessarily flawless. 7 6 Essays earning a score of 7 fit the description of 6 essays but are distinguished by more complete or more purposeful argumentation and synthesis of sources, or a more mature prose style. Adequate Essays earning a score of 6 adequately develop a position on the effects of advertising. They synthesize at least three of the sources. The argument is generally convincing and the sources generally support the student’s position, but the argument is less developed or less cogent than the arguments of essays earning higher scores. The language may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear. 5 4 Essays earning a score of 5 develop a position on the effects of advertising. They support the position by synthesizing at least three sources, but their arguments and their use of sources are somewhat limited, inconsistent, or uneven. The argument is generally clear, and the sources generally support the student’s position, but the links between the sources and the argument may be strained. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but it usually conveys the writer’s ideas adequately. Inadequate Essays earning a score of 4 inadequately develop a position on the effects of advertising. They attempt to present an argument and support the position by synthesizing at least two sources but may misunderstand, misrepresent, or oversimplify either their own argument or the sources they include. The link between the argument and the sources is weak. The prose of 4 essays may suggest immature control of writing. ∗ For the purposes of scoring, synthesis refers to combining the sources and the writer’s position to form a cohesive, supported argument, and accurately citing sources. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 1 (continued) 3 2 Essays earning a score of 3 meet the criteria for a score of 4 but demonstrate less understanding of the sources, less success in developing their own position, or less control of writing. Little Success Essays earning a score of 2 demonstrate little success in developing a position on the effects of advertising. They may merely allude to knowledge gained from reading the sources rather than citing the sources themselves. These essays may misread the sources, fail to present an argument, or substitute a simpler task by merely responding to the question tangentially or merely summarizing the sources. The prose of 2 essays often demonstrates consistent weaknesses in writing, such as a lack of development or organization, grammatical problems, or a lack of control. 1 0 Essays earning a score of 1 meet the criteria for a score of 2 but are especially simplistic, are weak in their control of writing, or do not cite even one source. Indicates an on-topic response that receives no credit, such as one that merely repeats the prompt. — Indicates a blank response or one that is completely off topic. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING COMMENTARY Question 1 Overview This year’s first prompt represented the debut of a new type of question for AP English Language and Composition, the synthesis essay. Students were given six brief sources, one of which was an advertisement that combined graphic and textual information, and directed to write a coherent, argumentative essay that synthesized at least three of the sources in support of their position on the effects of advertising in contemporary society. The students received this explicit instruction: “Your argument should be central; the sources should support this argument. Avoid merely summarizing sources.” Sample: 1A Score: 8 This essay begins strongly, as the student surveys a broad view of the topic at hand, the effects of advertising, but then moves quickly to establish a more focused perspective—namely, that advertising “fosters democratic dissemination of information and allows any institution or individual the freedom that is so crucial to an open society.” The modifiers, both individual words and relative clauses (“democratic” and “that is so crucial to an open society”), not only lend clarity and finesse to the central assertion but also provide a map for the student (and reader) to follow in the remainder of the response. The essay then provides a very capable synthesis of three sources (B, F, and E), all the while shaping and controlling the citations so that the writing logically supports the point stated in the opening sentence of the second paragraph: “Those who claim that advertising manipulates certainly have strong examples of the power that advertising has to manipulate.” The student comments on the sources—even with a brief interruptive phrase like “and despicably”—as well as summarizes them. By beginning the second paragraph with “Those who claim . . . ,” the student is setting up the essay for the very effective contrastive transition that begins the third paragraph, which maintains that “Experts on advertising . . . do not, however, question the ethics of advertising when it is being used for the common good.” The student skillfully and fluently argues that advertising techniques seen “in the hands of greedy corporations” as “‘deceitful’” are seen “in the hands of nonprofits, political movements, and public services” as “‘effective.’” Not only is this ability to draw such contrasts the mark of an effective writer, but so also are the balance and control of diction and examples. As in the previous paragraph, the student offers a well-controlled synthesis of three sources (A, D, and C) in support of the claim that “advertising . . . has an extremely positive effect on society.” Rather than simply stopping at this point, the student ends with a flourish that ties the conclusion back to the mention of “democratic dissemination” and an “open society” in the introduction. The two final paragraphs develop a metaphor and a very intelligent analogy based on it: Advertising “at its very core is speech,” the student maintains, and just as we value free speech, so must we value the freedom of advertising. “Advertising is seen as a cause of terrible aspects of society, but in reality, the content, not the advertisement, is responsible. Please, don’t shoot the messenger.” © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING COMMENTARY Question 1 (continued) Sample: 1B Score: 6 This essay begins with a series of evocative images, designed to catch the reader’s attention and to reinforce the idea that advertising surrounds us, and by the end of the first paragraph has focused on the clear idea, adequately stated, that although “advertising can promote unhealthy behavior, it more often benefits consumers by keeping them informed and showing them what products are out there.” The student proceeds to develop the first half of this central claim by describing how cigarette companies have marketed their products. A synthesis of Source B is part of this discussion. Although the syntax on the top of the second page is slightly confusing (for example, the second full sentence on the page is inadvertently missing a “not”), the writing is still completely readable, and the student makes the case. The third paragraph begins with a transitional sentence that briefly alludes to an idea from the previous paragraph before moving on to mention quickly advertising about seatbelt use (from Source D) and then introduce the efforts of an organization (a not-for-profit? an actual company?) called “truth” that tries to counter the unhealthy effects of advertising, such as that from tobacco companies. With simply additive language, the essay next moves to argue that advertising is “essential to keeping people informed” about both products and services. A synthesis of Source C is part of this discussion. The essay ends with a rather interesting discussion, but one that seems disconnected from the rest of the piece. The student ruminates briefly on what our culture would be like without advertising, a discussion that would have been more effective had it been tied more explicitly to the introduction, then concludes by essentially restating the thesis. Sample: 1C Score: 4 This essay begins with a broad, rather unfocused paragraph, one that suggests some confusion about whether to argue about advertising in general or about its effects. The central claim is bald and straightforward: “the positive effects outweigh the negative.” The development of this claim follows the same pattern in the paragraphs that follow: assertion plus a bit of embedded direct quotation plus a here’swhat-this-means gloss from the student. The essay reads like an oversimplified examination answer, dutifully showing that the student has read the sources, rather than an argumentative essay, in which the student has synthesized the source material. The conclusion, “It is ultimately up to the viewer to decide how advertising will affect them,” is relatively weak, primarily because the central claim has not been forceful or sophisticated, and the student has not really synthesized the sources but instead has dropped them into sentences. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2009 for the course OC 9876 taught by Professor Dq during the Spring '09 term at UC Merced.

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