ap07_englang_op_q2

ap07_englang_op_q2 - AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 2 The score should reflect a judgment of the essay’s quality as a whole. Remember that students had only 40 minutes to read and write; therefore, the essay is not a finished product and should not be judged by standards that are appropriate for an out-of-class assignment. Evaluate the essay as a draft, making certain to reward students for what they do well. All essays, even those scored 8 or 9, may contain occasional flaws in analysis, prose style, or mechanics. Such features should enter into the holistic evaluation of an essay’s overall quality. In no case may an essay with many distracting errors in grammar and mechanics be scored higher than a 2. 9 8 Essays earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for 8 essays and, in addition, are especially sophisticated in their explanation or demonstrate particularly impressive control of language. Effective Essays earning a score of 8 effectively analyze the strategies Sanders uses to develop his perspective about moving. The prose demonstrates an ability to control a wide range of the elements of effective writing but is not necessarily flawless. 7 6 Essays earning a score of 7 fit the description of 6 essays but provide a more complete explanation or demonstrate a more mature prose style. Adequate Essays earning a score of 6 adequately analyze the strategies Sanders uses to develop his perspective about moving. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear. 5 4 Essays earning a score of 5 analyze the strategies Sanders uses to develop his perspective about moving. These essays may, however, provide uneven, inconsistent, or limited explanations. The writing may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but it usually conveys the student’s ideas. Inadequate Essays earning a score of 4 inadequately analyze the strategies Sanders uses to develop his perspective about moving. The prose generally conveys the student’s ideas but may suggest immature control of writing. 3 2 Essays earning a score of 3 meet the criteria for a score of 4 but demonstrate less success in analyzing the strategies Sanders uses to develop his perspective about moving. The essays may show less control of writing. Little Success Essays earning a score of 2 demonstrate little success in analyzing the strategies Sanders uses to develop his perspective about moving. These essays may misunderstand the prompt; fail to analyze the strategies Sanders uses to develop his perspective about moving; or substitute a simpler task by responding to the prompt tangentially with unrelated, inaccurate, or inappropriate explanation. The prose often demonstrates consistent weaknesses in writing. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 2 (continued) 1 0 Essays earning a score of 1 meet the criteria for a score of 2 but are undeveloped, especially simplistic in their explanation, and/or weak in their control of language. Indicates an on-topic response that receives no credit, such as one that merely repeats the prompt. — Indicates a blank response or one that is completely off topic. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ©2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING COMMENTARY Question 2 Overview This question called for students to analyze the strategies used by essayist Scott Russell Sanders in a passage that encourages readers to consider the personal, social, and environmental advantages of “staying put.” Writing in response to Salman Rushdie’s essay celebrating migrants who root themselves in ideas, not places, Sanders argues in favor of habitation, not migration. Sample: 2A Score: 9 This essay offers no elaborate introduction. It doesn’t need to: The analysis question calls for an examination answer, not a discursive essay, and this student follows an instinct to get right to work on the analysis. The essay first examines Sanders’s use of material directly quoted from the Rushdie essay, showing how Sanders uses the Rushdie material as a springboard for developing his own beliefs. The student notes the effect of Sanders’s direct quoting: “In quoting Rushdie directly and repeting [sic] his words and syntax, Sanders not only assures the reader of his careful thoughtfulness on the issue, but also states his own belief that moving does nothing to rid us of the unfortunate aspects of humanity of which we all wish to be free.” The student next examines how Sanders moves from legitimately and honestly examining Rushdie’s argument to offer his own counterargument. The response offers a succinct evaluation of this organizational strategy: “This gradual movement from agreement to complete disagreement reinforces Sander’s [sic] pont [sic] and respectfully refutes Rushdie’s point consequently.” Finally, the writer analyzes Sanders’s “conversational and informal” tone: “He is respectful of the man whose ideas he is refuting—there is not even a hint of ad hominem argument in this essay, for Sanders never attacks Rushdie himself.” In summary, this paper analyzes the logic, organization, and tone of Sanders’s essay quite fully and fluently. Sample: 2B Score: 6 This essay opens with a broad assessment of Sanders’s “veritable plethora of rhetorical strategies” and then focuses on what the student sees as a “skeptical, critical, and even at times mocking tone.” The essay praises Sanders’s “colorful diction,” even mentioning the use of zeugma (but without clearly pointing out where it is in the original text). The student recognizes Sanders’s use of first-person plural pronouns, “which immediately unifies the perspective of the author and the reader,” but then senses a shift toward skepticism in Sanders’s diction. Throughout this opening section of the essay, the student does a good job of explaining how diction and style support Sanders’s evolving ideas. The next move, though, keeps the essay in the adequate, rather than effective, range by arguing that Sanders attacks Rushdie, “even mocking his syntactical structure.” It is difficult to substantiate such overstated claims. The student’s subsequent attempt to show how Sanders’s use of historical examples both “bolsters his argument” and “lend[s] ethos to his opinions” is quite acceptable, however. The essay concludes with a quite nice, if brief, comparison between Rushdie as a “consummate romantic” and Sanders as a “pragmatist.” In short, this essay shows all the hallmarks of a first draft, which, if the student could return to it, temper its overstatement, and flesh out its points with examples, would be effective. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION 2007 SCORING COMMENTARY Question 2 (continued) Sample: 2C Score: 4 This essay is an inadequate response to the task. It is disjointed. It identifies discrete features without ever clearly explaining how the features connect to, and support, Sanders’s purpose and evolving ideas. The essay begins with a gloss on the content and relies on glossing heavily throughout. It observes that Sanders supports his points with historical examples and even notes that some of these examples evoke imagery. The student remarks that “Sanders also uses a lot of parallel structure in his examples of the things Americans do” and offers a brief analysis of the effect of that syntactic strategy. The student then refers to Sanders’s use of historical examples and points out his use of a simile—“comparing the mind of people and the land of the world to dough and cookie cutters”—quoting Sanders’s conclusion that “‘The habit of our industry and commerce has been to force identical schemes onto differing locales.’” The essay concludes by attempting to praise the diction of the final paragraph, but the student seems incapable of offering examples, saying merely that “It just makes the reader think.” The student seems to know what analysis is but inadequately performs the task, falling back on the strategies of paraphrasing content and pointing out stylistic features yet not connecting the two. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). ...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online