ap04_frq_ushistory_b

ap04_frq_ushistory_b - AP® United States History 2004...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: AP® United States History 2004 Free-Response Questions Form B The materials included in these files are intended for noncommercial use by AP teachers for course and exam preparation; permission for any other use ® must be sought from the Advanced Placement Program . Teachers may reproduce them, in whole or in part, in limited quantities, for face-to-face teaching purposes but may not mass distribute the materials, electronically or otherwise. This permission does not apply to any third-party copyrights contained herein. These materials and any copies made of them may not be resold, and the copyright notices must be retained as they appear here. The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 4,500 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. For further information, visit www.collegeboard.com Copyright © 2004 College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Central, AP Vertical Teams, APCD, Pacesetter, Pre-AP, SAT, Student Search Service, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark jointly owned by the College Entrance Examination Board and the National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Educational Testing Service and ETS are registered trademarks of Educational Testing Service. Other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. For the College Board’s online home for AP professionals, visit AP Central at apcentral.collegeboard.com. 2004 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part A (Suggested writing time—45 minutes) Percent of Section II score—45 Directions: The following question requires you to construct a coherent essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents A-H and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. High scores will be earned only by essays that both cite key pieces of evidence from the documents and draw on outside knowledge of the period. 1. How and for what reasons did United States foreign policy change between 1920 and 1941 ? Use the documents and your knowledge of the period 1920-1941 to construct your response. Document A Source: Candidate Warren G. Harding in a speech at Des Moines, Iowa, October 1920. I oppose the League not because I fail to understand what . . . ‘we are being let in for,’ but because I believe I understand precisely what we are being let in for. I do not want to clarify these obligations; I want to turn my back on them. It is not interpretation but rejection that I am seeking. My position is that the present League strikes a deadly blow at our constitutional integrity and surrenders to a dangerous extent our independence of action. Document B Source: Charles Evans Hughes, secretary of state, Washington, D.C., November 12, 1921. The world looks to this Conference to relieve humanity of the crushing burden created by competition in armament, and it is the view of the American Government that we should meet that expectation without any unnecessary delay. It is therefore proposed that the Conference should proceed at once to consider the question of the limitation of armament. . . . Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2 2004 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document C Source: Edwin L. James, European correspondent of The New York Times, October 1930. Officially, our government stays out of world organizations . . . we continue to shy at the World Court. But such things count for less and less. We must deal with the world and the world must deal with us. Let there be an international conference, and imponderable influences bring the United States there. A conference on reparations, we are there. The International Bank is set up, an American is made president. The World Court meets, an American is put on the bench . . . It is always the case that the American position is among the most important. Such is one of the prices of our power. Few world problems arise in which the influence of the United States will not swing the decision if we take a real interest. Opposition to the United States is a serious undertaking. Our dollars are powerful; there are so many of them. Document D Source: “Butchery Marked Capture of Nanking” The New York Times, December 18, 1937. Through wholesale atrocities and vandalism at Nanking the Japanese Army has thrown away a rare opportunity to gain the respect and confidence of the Chinese inhabitants and of foreign opinion there . . . Wholesale looting, the violation of women, the murder of civilians, the eviction of Chinese from their homes, mass executions of war prisoners and the impressing of able-bodied men [have] turned Nanking into a city of terror. The killing of civilians [has been] widespread. Foreigners who traveled widely through the city Wednesday found dead on every street. Some of the victims were aged men, women, and children . . . Many victims were bayoneted and some of the wounds were barbarously cruel. Any person who ran because of fear or excitement was likely to be killed on the spot as was anyone caught by roving patrols in streets or alleys after dusk. Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 3 2004 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document E Source: Republican Party platform, June 1940. The Republican Party is firmly opposed to involving this nation in a foreign war. We are still suffering from the ill effects of the last World War . . . The Republican Party stands for Americanism, preparedness and peace. We accordingly fasten upon the New Deal full responsibility for our unpreparedness and for the consequent danger of involvement in war. We declare for the prompt, orderly, and realistic building of our national defense to the point at which we shall be able not only to defend the United States, its possessions, and essential outposts from foreign attack, but also efficiently to uphold in war the Monroe Doctrine. Source: Democratic Party platform, July 1940. The American people are determined that war, raging in Europe, Asia and Africa, shall not come to America. We will not participate in foreign wars, and we will not send our army, naval or air forces to fight in foreign lands outside of the Americas, except in case of attack. We favor and shall rigorously enforce and defend the Monroe Doctrine . . . We must be so strong that no possible combination of powers would dare to attack us. We propose to provide America with an invincible air force, a navy strong enough to protect all our seacoasts and our national interests, and a fully-equipped and mechanized army. Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 4 2004 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document F Source: Full-page advertisement in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, September 1940. Mr. Roosevelt today committed an act of war. He also became America’s first dictator. Secretly his Secretary of State, Mr. Hull, entered into an agreement with the British Ambassador that amounts to a military and naval alliance with Great Britain . . . The President has passed down an edict that compares with the edicts forced down the throats of Germans, Italians and Russians by Hitler, Mussolini and Stalin. He hands down an edict that may eventually result in the shedding of the blood of millions of Americans; that may result in transforming the United States into a goose-stepping regimented slave-state . . . Of all the sucker real estate deals in history, this is the worst, and the President of the United States is the sucker. Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 5 2004 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document G Source: Chicago Daily News, November 25, 1940. © Tribune Media Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Reprinted with permission. Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 6 2004 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document H Source: President Franklin D. Roosevelt, press conference, December 17, 1940. In the present world situation . . . it is important from a selfish viewpoint of American defense that we should do everything to help the British Empire defend itself. Suppose the home of the President’s neighbor catches fire and he has a length of hose, 400 or 500 feet. If he can take the hose and connect it to the neighbor’s hydrant, he may be able to put out the fire. He does not say his hose cost $15; pay me $15. He doesn’t want $15, but his [hose] back when the fire is over. The neighbor gives back the hose and pays him for the use of it. If it gets smashed in the fire, the President says he was glad to lend it. The neighbor says he will replace the part destroyed. If the President has got back his hose, he has done a pretty good job. END OF DOCUMENTS FOR QUESTION 1 Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 7 2004 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part B and Part C (Suggested total planning and writing time—70 minutes) Percent of Section II score—55 Part B Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 2. To what extent was the election of 1800 aptly named the “Revolution of 1800”? Respond with reference to TWO of the following areas: Economics Foreign policy Judiciary Politics 3. To what extent and in what ways did the roles of women change in American society between 1790 and 1860 ? Respond with reference to TWO of the following areas: Domestic Economic Political Social Part C Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 4. Analyze the primary causes of the population shift from a rural to an urban environment in the United States between 1875 and 1925. 5. “Between 1960 and 1975, there was great progress in the struggle for political and social equality.” Assess the validity of this statement with respect to TWO of the following groups during that period. African Americans Asian Americans Latinos Native Americans Women END OF EXAMINATION Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). 8 ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/01/2009 for the course OC 9876 taught by Professor Dq during the Spring '09 term at UC Merced.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online