ap04_sg_ushist

ap04_sg_ushist - AP® United States History 2004 Scoring...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: AP® United States History 2004 Scoring Guidelines The materials included in these files are intended for noncommercial use by AP teachers for course and exam preparation; permission for any other use ® must be sought from the Advanced Placement Program . Teachers may reproduce them, in whole or in part, in limited quantities, for face-to-face teaching purposes but may not mass distribute the materials, electronically or otherwise. This permission does not apply to any third-party copyrights contained herein. These materials and any copies made of them may not be resold, and the copyright notices must be retained as they appear here. The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 4,500 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. For further information, visit www.collegeboard.com Copyright © 2004 College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Central, AP Vertical Teams, APCD, Pacesetter, Pre-AP, SAT, Student Search Service, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Educational Testing Service and ETS are registered trademarks of Educational Testing Service. Other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. For the College Board’s online home for AP professionals, visit AP Central at apcentral.collegeboard.com. AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 1 In what ways did the French and Indian War (1754-63) alter the political, economic and ideological relations between Great Britain and its American colonies? Use the documents and your knowledge of the period 1740-1766 in constructing your response. The 8-9 Essay • Contains a well-developed thesis that examines the ways in which the war altered relations between Great Britain and the American colonies. • Presents an effective analysis of the political, economic, and ideological relations between Great Britain and the American colonies during this period, and how the war altered those relations. o References to the political, economic, and ideological relations may be implicit. • Effectively uses a substantial number of documents. • Supports thesis with substantial and relevant outside information. • May contain minor errors. • Is clearly organized and well written. The 5-7 Essay • Contains a thesis that addresses the ways in which the war altered the relations between Great Britain and the American colonies. • Has some limited analysis of the political, economic, and ideological relations between Great Britain and the American colonies during this period, and how the war altered those relations. o References to the relations may be implicit; may only address two of the three relations. • Effectively uses some documents. • Supports thesis with some relevant outside information. • May have errors that do not seriously detract from the quality of the essay. • Shows acceptable organization and writing; language errors do not interfere with the comprehension of the essay. The 2-4 Essay • Contains a limited or undeveloped thesis. • Deals with the question in a general manner; simplistic treatment of the political, economic, and ideological relations between Great Britain and the American colonies; and/or simplistic presentation on the impact of the war. • May address only one category. • Merely refers to, quotes or briefly cites documents. • Contains little outside information, or information that is inaccurate or irrelevant. • May have major errors. • May be poorly organized and/or written. The 0-1 Essay • Contains no thesis or a thesis that does not address the question. • Exhibits inadequate or incorrect understanding of the question. • Has little or no understanding of the documents, or ignores them completely. • Has numerous errors. • Written so poorly that it inhibits understanding. -- blank or completely off task Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 2 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 2 Analyze the impact of the American Revolution on both slavery and the status of women in the period from 1775-1800. The 8 - 9 Essay • Contains a clear, well-developed thesis regarding the impact of the American Revolution on both slavery and the status of women between 1775 and 1800. • Provides substantial, relevant information on both issues from the period between 1775 and 1800. • Effectively analyzes the impact of the Revolution on both issues, but may not cover both equally. • May contain minor errors. • Is well organized and well written. The 5 - 7 Essay • Contains a thesis, which may be partially developed, addressing the impact of the American Revolution on both slavery and the status of women between 1775 and 1800. • Supports thesis with some relevant information on both issues from 1775 to 1800, but may focus more on one. • Analyzes to some extent the impact of the Revolution on both issues from 1775-1800. • May contain errors that do not seriously detract from the essay. • Has acceptable organization and writing. The 2 – 4 Essay • Presents a thesis that may be undeveloped in terms of addressing the impact of the American Revolution on both slavery and the status of women between 1775 and 1800; or presents no thesis. • Includes little relevant information from 1775-1800, or may contain only generalizations. • Has little or no analysis of the impact of the Revolution. • May contain major errors. • May be poorly organized and/or written. The 0 – 1 Essay • Lacks a thesis or restates the question. • Includes no relevant information from 1775-1800 on either issue. • Contains no analysis of the impact of the Revolution. • May contain numerous errors, both major and minor. • Is poorly organized and/or written. -- blank or completely off task Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 3 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 2 (cont’d.) Relevant Information and General Observations Regarding Slavery • • • • • • • • • • • • • Declaration of Independence proclaims that all men are created equal and endowed with natural and unalienable rights, providing the ideological rationale for the formal assault on slavery. Quakers form first of many antislavery societies in 1775. By 1792, they will exist from Virginia to Massachusetts. Vermont state constitution abolishes slavery in 1777. Massachusetts Bill of Rights in 1780 declares ALL persons free and equal, leading to general emancipation there. Pennsylvania constitution in 1780 provides for gradual emancipation of the children of current slaves when children reach 28; similar provision adopted by Connecticut and Rhode Island in 1784. By 1786 all states in North except border state of Delaware had gradual or immediate abolition, although New York (1785) and New Jersey (1786) do not enact effective laws until 1799 and 1804, respectively. Southern states, such as Maryland and Virginia, provide for individual manumission of slaves. a. Washington frees 300 slaves in 1799 in his will. Lord Dunmore’s call for slaves to leave their masters, take up arms, and thereby earn their freedom, prompts Washington to change policy in Dec. 1775 to enlist free blacks; later slaves could receive freedom by fighting in the army. South Carolina and Georgia refused to recruit slaves. About 5,000 Blacks fought for the Revolution, but estimated 30,000 fled Virginia with the British, 25,000 from South Carolina, and a half to three-quarters of those in Georgia (ca 15,000). Many go either to Canada or to England. Continental Congress had voted to ban slave importations in Fall 1774, effective December 1775. Eventually (by 1786) all states either ban or heavily tax slave trade but only periodically in South Carolina and Georgia, and it is resumed toward end of century or in early 1800s in South. Traditional trade advantages with Great Britain decrease, reducing tobacco exports and nearly eliminating the export of indigo. Slavery actually declines until the early 1800s and the expansion of th cotton production. Cotton was not a major crop during the latter half of the 18 century. Cotton gin was invented in 1793 but took some years to have a full impact. Major accomplishment: Northwest Ordinance of 1787 prohibits slavery in any states established there. Major drag on emancipation is the new federal Constitution’s three-fifths clause, fugitive slave provision, and prohibition of ban on slave trade for twenty years. Inspired by American Revolution as well as the uprising in Haiti was the plot by Gabriel Prosser in summer of 1800. Census of 1790 reports 697,624 slaves in U.S. and 59,557 Free Blacks. Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 4 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 2 (cont’d.) Relevant Information and General Observations Regarding Status of Women • • • • • • • • • Revolution compels women to take more active, hands on role in managing farms and businesses while husbands are in military, enhancing men’s perception of the rationality and competency of their wives. Other than some courts adopting a more liberal stance toward women seeking divorce, there are NO significant legal gains or expansion of political rights for women—and indeed some evidence of losses regarding wives’ property (prenuptial) and dower rights. Any such legal gains were “negligible.” a. Making divorce somewhat more accessible for women in some places is regarded by some as the “sole major gain” in concrete, legal terms for the status of women at this time. Principal changes in status of women take place in terms of the perception of women as wives and mothers in the family sphere—not public or political one. Response to demonstrations of competency during the war prompt women to place more emphasis within marriage and family on affection, esteem, friendship, mutuality, and complementarity of spouses—that wives are to be viewed as companions, as individuals entitled to happiness, and that marriages are “companionate” rather than hierarchical with men’s “absolute authority.” a. Part of shift toward regard for the happiness of women is their claim of a right to turn down the selection of spouses (not quite in selection but at least in the right of refusal) as well as, by the 1790s, the beginning of an acceptance of women who choose not to marry. Women call for more educational opportunities, and by 1790s more provisions were made for elementary and secondary education for girls and young women, including the establishment of “female academies,” thus beginning a reduction in the literacy gap between men and women. One of the first was the Philadelphia Young Ladies Academy established in 1787. Others followed in principal cities and even smaller towns in the North and South. The establishment of the Ladies Association of Philadelphia in 1780 to aid soldiers spurs other such efforts to encourage women to play this public role by performing patriotic activities, such as spinning, weaving, and sewing clothing for soldiers. During the war some women participated in boycotts of merchants accused of hoarding, such as the Daughters of Liberty, but, other than private discussions regarding public affairs and one petition by women in North Carolina about their right to speak out and be heard, women did not speak out publicly or participate politically. However, writings and commentaries by such women, North and South, as Abigail Adams, Mercy Warren, and Judith Sargent Murray, do reveal an impact in terms of women beginning to reevaluate their status; hence, Adams’ admonition to John to “Remember the women….” a. One exception was the New Jersey constitutional provision giving heads of households who paid taxes the right to vote, which unintentionally allowed women (usually widows but possibly some other unmarried women) to vote until, after three decades, that was abolished in 1807. A major development is the emergence of what comes to be called Republican Motherhood, the perception of mothers as the proper persons to convey family ideals to their children and in particular to impart virtue, piety, and patriotism to their sons, who will have the responsibility of preserving republicanism—thus enhancing the social significance of motherhood and the positive image of women rather than the traditional one of women as incompetent and weak. New perceptions of women are most apparent in the North and among those of the propertied or “better sort” of social classes. Traditional ideas that women were to be subservient and domestic by no means disappeared. In sum, there emerges a new ideal concerning companionate marriage, a new legitimacy for educating females, a new rhetoric of self-esteem among women, and an enhanced regard for motherhood and its civic role. Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 5 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 3 Analyze the effectiveness of political compromise in reducing sectional tensions in the period from 1820 to 1861. The 8-9 Essay • Contains a clear, well-developed thesis regarding the effectiveness of political compromise in reducing sectional tensions in the period 1820 to 1861. • Supports the thesis with substantial, relevant information. • Provides effective analysis of the question over the time frame. • May contain minor errors. • Is well organized and well written. The 5-7 Essay • Contains a thesis that addresses the effectiveness of political compromise in reducing sectional tensions in the period from 1820 to 1861. • Supports the thesis with some relevant information. • Provides some analysis of the question over time; treatment of time frame and/or issues may be uneven. • May contain errors that do not seriously detract from the quality of the essay. • Has acceptable organization and writing. The 2-4 Essay • May contain a confused or unfocused thesis, or may simply paraphrase the statement. • Provides minimal relevant information or merely states facts. • Provides little or no analysis, mostly generalizations. • May contain major errors. • May be poorly organized and/or written. The 0-1 Essay • Lacks a thesis or restates the question. • Demonstrates an incompetent or inappropriate response. • Contains no analysis. • Contains substantial factual errors. • Is poorly organized and/or written. -- blank or completely off task Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 6 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 3 (cont’d.) Information List Missouri Compromise (1820) Talmadge Amendment (1819) Henry Clay, The Great Compromiser Missouri enters Union as slave state Maine enters Union as free state Status of remaining lands of Louisiana Purchase territory determined by location north or south of 36 30 (36 degrees 30 minutes) Tariff of 1828 (“Tariff of Abominations”) South Carolina Exposition and Protest (1828) John Calhoun Webster-Hayne Debate (1830) Tariff of 1832 South Carolina Ordinance of Nullification (1832) Force Act (“Force Bill,” 1833) Tariff of 1833 (Compromise Tariff) Henry Clay Gradual tariff reduction to 1816 levels (in Tariff of 1842) South Carolina Nullification of the Force Act (1833) Texas statehood (1845) Mexican War (1846-1848) Wilmot Proviso (Passed several times in House, 1846-1847; rejected by Senate) David Wilmot (Democrat) Nashville Convention (1850) Compromise of 1850 Henry Clay crafts “Omnibus Bill” Stephen A. Douglas (splits Omnibus into 5 parts) California as free state Fugitive Slave Act Slave trade ended in Washington, D.C. Remaining Mexican Cession settlement based on popular sovereignty Texas granted $10 million to settle boundary dispute Kansas Nebraska Act (1854) Nebraska Bill (1854) Stephen A. Douglas Bleeding Kansas (Sack of Lawrence; Lecompton Constitution) John Brown Pottawatomie Creek (1856); Brown at Harper’s Ferry (1859) Republican Party (1854) Non-extension of slavery Dred Scott decision (1857) Missouri Compromise line unconstitutional Blacks denied citizenship Free soil does not make a free man Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 7 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 3 (cont’d.) Lincoln-Douglas Debates (1858) James C. Buchanan Election of 1860 Republicans, Northern Democrats, Southern Democrats, Constitutional Union Parties Crittenden (Proposal) Compromise (1860) Secession (1860-1861). Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 8 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 4 Compare and contrast the programs and policies designed by reformers of the Progressive era to those designed by reformers of the New Deal period. Confine your answer to programs and policies that addressed the needs of those living in poverty. The 8-9 Essay • Contains a clear, well-developed thesis that compares and contrasts Progressive era and New Deal programs and policies addressing the needs of those living in poverty. • Supports the thesis with substantial, specific, and relevant information. • Presents a reasonably balanced treatment that effectively compares and contrasts the Progressive era and New Deal programs and policies addressing the needs of those living in poverty. • May contain minor errors. • Is well-organized and well-written. The 5 -7 Essay • Contains a thesis that may be partially developed that compares and contrasts Progressive era and New Deal programs and policies addressing the needs of those living in poverty. • Supports the thesis with some specific, relevant information. • Presents a limited or imbalanced treatment that compares and contrasts the Progressive era and New Deal programs and policies addressing the needs of those living in poverty. • May contain errors that do not seriously detract from the quality of the essay. • Has acceptable organization and writing. The 2-4 Essay • Contains a confused or undeveloped thesis that may not compare and contrast the Progressive era and New Deal programs and policies addressing the needs of those living in poverty. • Provides few relevant facts, with little or no comparison or contrast. • Imbalanced treatment of time periods and/or programs and policies addressing the needs of those living in poverty. • May contain major errors. • May be poorly organized and/or written. The 0-1 Essay • Lacks a thesis or simply restates the question. • Demonstrates an incompetent or inappropriate response. • Has little or no understanding of the question. • May contain substantial factual errors. • Is poorly organized and/or written. -- blank or completely off task Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 9 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 4 (cont’d.) Comparison/Contrast Fact Chart PROGRESSIVE ERA POLICIES Government should correct social and economic problems of society Provide social and economic assistance to immigrants/poor families Prohibition of alcohol to lessen problems of poverty and abuse Provide voting rights for women Collective bargaining, strike Protect women and children in factories and slums Overall Summary NEW DEAL Overall Summary IGNORED BY BOTH PROGRAMS Social Justice Movement Settlement House Movement Temperance Movement (WCTU) th 18 Amendment Woman Suffrage Movement th 19 Amendment Rights for Labor Unions Safety regulations for factories and tenements Child Labor laws Maximum work hours for women and children/minimum wage for women Liberalized divorce laws Birth control rights for women Improve schools and court process for juveniles No direct financial relief/jobs provided Most legislation passed at state and local level Provide relief, recovery, reform and restore confidence in economy Restore confidence in banks Protect bank deposits, homes, mortgages Provide jobs Provide sounder currency Provide refinancing for farms, provide farm subsidies and maintain farm prices Provide assistance for elderly, unemployed, and those with disabilities Collective bargaining for unions-Protect workers’ rights Most legislation passed at federal level Provided jobs, direct relief, economic reform Economic, social, and political rights for African-Americans First Hundred Days FERA Emergency Banking Relief Act FDIC, HOLC, FHA CCC, CWA, WPA, PWA Eliminate gold standard Farm Credit Administration, AAA Social Security Act Wagner Act – NLRB Fair Labor Standards Act Niagara Movement/NAACP Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 10 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 4 (cont’d.) Fact Sheet What we saw: PROGRESSIVE ERA Theodore Roosevelt - Square Deal Anthracite Coal Strike (1902) William H. Taft Woodrow Wilson th 16 Amendment-Income Tax th 17 Amendment-Direct Election of US Senators th 18 Amendment- Prohibition th 19 Amendment -Women’s Suffrage Labor Laws- Clayton Anti-Trust Act (1914), Child Labor Act (Keating-Owen Act-1916), Adamson Act (1916), Workingmen’s Comp. Act (1916) Muckrakers Lincoln Steffens The Shame of the Cities Jacob Riis How the Other Half Lives Upton Sinclair The Jungle Ray Stannard Baker Following the Color Line John Spargo The Bitter Cry of the Children Charles Sheldon In His Steps Social Justice Movement Social Gospel/Rauschenbusch Immigrants/New Immigration Settlement House Movement Jane Addams - Hull House Frances Kelly Lillian Wald – Henry Street Settlement Eleanor Roosevelt Women’s Christian Temperance Movement (WCTU) Frances Willard Alice Paul/National Women’s Party Margaret Sanger Triangle Shirtwaist Fire (1911) Mueller v. Oregon (1908)-Brandeis Niagara Movement/NAACP W.E.B. Du Bois Political Reforms-Initiative, Referendum, Recall Robert LaFollette-Wisconsin Urban League NEW DEAL Franklin D. Roosevelt (FDR) Great Depression First Hundred Days Relief, Recovery, Reform Bank Holiday - Emergency Banking Relief Act Alphabet Agencies – CCC, CWA, FERA, AAA/Farm Credit Admin., WPA, FAP, FDIC, FHA, TVA, Resettlement Admin. (RA), NYA Social Security Act (1935) Labor Laws-Wagner Act (1935), Fair Labor Standards Act (1938) Eleanor Roosevelt Deficit spending – Keynesian economics Pump priming Dust bowl farmers-Okies Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 11 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 5 Analyze the successes and failures of the United States Cold War policy of containment as it developed in TWO of the following regions of the world during the period 1945 to 1975. East and Southeast Asia Europe Latin America Middle East The 8-9 Essay • Contains a clear, well-developed thesis that analyzes the successes and failures of the United States Cold War policy of containment in two of the four regions of the world during the period 1945 to 1975. • Develops the thesis with substantial, relevant supporting information concerning the successes and failures of containment in two of the four regions during the period 1945 to 1975. • Provides effective analysis of containment in the time period in both regions, though may treat containment in one region with less depth than the other. • May contain minor errors. • Is well organized and well written. The 5 -7 Essay • Contains a clear thesis, which may be only partly developed, that begins to analyze the successes and failures of the United States policy of containment in two of the four regions of the world during the period 1945 to 1975. • Supports the thesis with some accurate information about the successes and failures of containment in two of the four regions during the period 1945 to 1975. • Provides some analysis of containment in the time period for both regions, though may be unbalanced in its coverage. • May contain errors that do not seriously detract from the quality of the essay. • Has acceptable organization and writing. The 2-4 Essay • Contains a weak or unfocused thesis about containment or merely paraphrases the question. • Provides few relevant facts; or lists facts with little or no application to the thesis. • May be largely descriptive or generalized, or addresses only one area. • May contain major errors. • May be poorly organized and/or written. The 0-1 Essay • Lacks a thesis or simply restates the question. • Demonstrates an incompetent or inadequate response. • Has little or no understanding of the question. • Contains substantial factual errors. • Is poorly organized and/or written. -- blank or completely off task Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 12 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 5 (cont’d.) Possible Information East and Southeast Asia • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Stabilization of Japan Mao Zedong and 1949 Chinese Revolution “Loss” of China Chiang Kai-shek (Jiang Jieshi) Korean War, 1950-53 th 38 parallel Quemoy and Matsu Support for Taiwan Success in keeping China off UN Security Council Bao Dai Vietnam Dienbienphu th 17 parallel Domino theory Geneva Accords, 1954 splitting VN SEATO creation, 1954 Support of Ngo Dinh Diem Revolt in Tibet crushed, 1959 Neutralization of Laos, 1962 Diem overthrow, 1963 Increased US advisors with JFK, 1962 LBJ and Tonkin Gulf, 1964 Operation Rolling Thunder Tet Offensive, 1968 My Lai massacre; Lt. William Calley Pueblo Incident, 1968 Vietnamization & Nixon Doctrine Pentagon Papers Invasion of Cambodia, 1970 Paris peace accords, 1973 “China Card,” 1971-73 Ping-Pong Diplomacy, 1971-72 Shanghai Communique, 1972 Two-China policy Détente and Nixon’s visit to USSR and China, 1972/73 Collapse of Democratic Republic of South Vietnam, April, 1975 Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 13 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 5 (cont’d.) Europe • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • George Frost Kennan (Mr. X) Iron Curtain Marshall Plan Truman Doctrine Division of Europe Two Germanys United Nations Tito and Yugoslavia Berlin Airlift, 1948-49 NATO, 1949 NSC-68 Death of Stalin, 1953 New Look policy Brinksmanship Massive Retaliation Mutual Assured Destruction Hungarian Revolt, 1956 U-2 incident, 1960 Berlin Wall, 1961 Invasion of Czechoslovakia, 1968 Ostpolitik ABM Treaty, 1972 SALT I, 1972 Latin America • • • • • • • • • • • Creation of OAS, 1948 CIA & overthrow of Arbenz in Guatamela, 1954 Cuban Revolution & Castro takeover, 1959 Bay of Pigs, 1961 Peace Corps created, 1961 JFK & Alliance for Progress, 1961 Cuban Missile Crisis, 1962 Mann Doctrine, 1965 Dominican Republic Revolution, 1965, & U.S. Marine deployment Agency for International Development (AID) & Office of Public Safety Support for overthrow of Salvador Allende in Chile, 1973 Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 14 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Question 5 (cont’d.) Middle East • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • CIA & overthrow of Mossadegh in Iran, 1953 Reza Shah Pahlavi King Farouk Gamel Abdul Nasser Suez Crisis, 1956 Aswan Dam CENTO, 1955 Eisenhower Doctrine Support of Israel from early 1960s Anwar Sadat Six-day War, 1967 Yom Kippur War, 1973 Kissinger & shuttle diplomacy OPEC & Oil Embargo, 1973 Lifting of Embargo, 1974 Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 15 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Document Information and Inferences—DBQ 2004 Document A: Maps of North America before 1754 and after 1763 Document Information: • Shows European colonies in North America before 1754 • British possessions on eastern seaboard and around Hudson Bay • French possessions are Mississippi River basin, Great Lakes, and St. Lawrence River valley • Spanish possessions are in Central America, American Southwest, and Florida • Shows European colonies in North American after 1763 • British possessions are east of the Mississippi River and north to include land around Hudson Bay • French possessions are virtually eliminated • Spanish possessions increased west and south of the Mississippi River • Russian expansion along the Pacific coast Document Inferences: • Significant shift of colonial power in North America to the British and the Spanish • Expanded territories lead to greater administrative responsibility for the mother country • The French are no longer a threat in North America • Leads to westward expansion and increased tensions with Native Americans Document B: Canassatego’s speech, 1742 Document Information: • Onondaga chief speech to colonial representatives from Pennsylvania, Maryland, and Virginia • States Indian lands are becoming more valuable • White settlers are moving onto Indian lands harming hunting • Insists that colonies remove settlers from further encroachment • White settlers have no right to settle on Indian lands Document Inferences: • Tensions existed between the Iroquois Confederation and British colonies • Earlier land treaties not fair • Indian way of life in jeopardy • White settlers are moving westward • Iroquois hope to prevent white encroachment on lands Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 16 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Document Information and Inferences—DBQ 2004 (cont’d.) Document C: George Washington, letter to Robert Orme, aide-de-camp to Edward Braddock, 1755 Document Information: • Washington volunteers to join the military campaign • Desires to serve “King & Country” • Desires to learn about military by serving with British regulars • Eager to serve with General Edward Braddock Document Inferences: • Washington fights in the French and Indian War • Washington shows loyalty to British government and its actions at this time • Washington’s respect for the British military • Colonial leadership beginning to emerge Document D: Massachusetts soldier’s diary, 1759 Document Information: • Winter approaches and soldiers need proper clothing and liquor • Not likely to get clothes or liquor • Claims to be an Englishman who is denied “Englishmen’s liberty” • Serving with the British army gives a sense of martial law • British soldiers little better than slaves to their officers • When enlistment ends, will carefully consider the issue of re-enlistment • Enlistment ends, but militia not allowed to leave • Colonial militiamen refused to continue enlistment Document Inferences: • Colonial militiaman enlisted to serve with British troops in war • British authority perceived to threaten the rights of Englishmen • Begins to question British authority • Colonial militiamen resisted British soldiers’ control • Disillusionment with and diminishing respect for the British army • Class divisions within the army, with soldiers poorly treated • Experience of war creates tensions between British troops and colonists Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 17 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Document Information and Inferences—DBQ 2004 (cont’d.) Document E: Rev. Thomas Barnard, sermon, Massachusetts, 1763 Document Information: • Praises blessings of Great Britain as mother country • America rejoices in reflection on past events and on the future • A new era of peace and freedom begins • With enemy threat removed the colonists can enjoy liberties obtained Document Inferences: • A celebration of ties with British and the removal of French and Native American threat • No sign of animosity between colonists and British • Recognizes the colonists’ role in bringing about the new era • Rising expectations and a sense of optimism Document F: British Order in Council, 1763 Document Information: • Revenue collected was insufficient and only paid one fourth of administrative costs • Neglect and fraud characterize custom duties collection and colonial trade • Need to generate revenue to maintain military protection of the colonies • New additional territory and growing population requires more oversight • Greater regulation of trade required Document Inferences: • Policy of “salutary neglect” coming to an end as British enforce “mercantilist” policies • Colonies need to assume a greater share of the cost of colonial administration • Increased British debt requires greater revenue from the colonies • Colonial governments will have less control over their own affairs as the British assert greater authority • Foreshadows larger military presence in the colonies and its impact Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 18 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Document Information and Inferences—DBQ 2004 (cont’d.) Document G: Benjamin Franklin (in London) letter to John Hughs (in Pennsylvania), 1765 Document Information: • Franklin is working to repeal the Stamp Act • Tells Hughs that enforcement of law may be unpopular • Advises Hughs to calm colonists fears about the law • Franklin advocates loyalty to the Crown and colonial government Document Inferences: • Franklin wants to work within political system but is unsure the Stamp Act will be repealed • Franklin alerts British officials about colonial opposition to the Stamp Act • Franklin favors maintaining law and order to prevent civil unrest • Franklin fears violent opposition from colonists and British retaliation Document H: Newspaper masthead, 1765 Document Information: • Pennsylvania newspaper critical of situation in 1765 • Skull and cross bones prominent • Provides location to place stamp • Say farewell to LIBERTY Document Inferences: • Tombstone masthead symbolizes death of colonial liberties • Encourages colonial opposition to the Stamp Act • Bemoans the loss of the rights of the colonists Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 19 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2004 SCORING GUIDELINES Document Information and Inferences—DBQ 2004 (cont’d.) Commonly Seen Relevant Outside Information King George III George Grenville Molasses Act (1733) Currency Act (1764) Sugar Act, or Revenue Act (1764) Writs of Assistance Stamp Act Congress (1765) Commodity boycotts Sons of Liberty Liberty trees Stamp Act riots tarring and feathering boycotts James Otis Patrick Henry Virginia Resolves Quartering Act (1765) Paxton Boys “no taxation without representation” “virtual” v. “actual” or “direct” representation “internal” v. “external” taxes John Locke repeal of Stamp Act (1766) Declaratory Act (1766) Navigation Acts Mercantile policies or mercantilism Triangular trade smuggling “salutary neglect” Robert Walpole War of Jenkins’ Ear King George’s War (1739-1748) Ohio Valley French fur trade with Indians Albany Plan of Union (1754) Pennsylvania Gazette, “Join or Die” cartoon Seven Years’ War (1756-1763) Impressment William Pitt Ft. Necessity (1754) Ft. Duquesne Ft. Pitt Battle of Quebec, Plains of Abraham (1759) Montcalm and Wolfe myth of invincibility of British military Treaty of Paris, 1763 Proclamation of 1763 (Line) Pontiac’s Rebellion Westward movement Copyright © 2004 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 20 ...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online