ap05_frq_us_history

ap05_frq_us_history - AP® United States History 2005...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® United States History 2005 Free-Response Questions The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 4,700 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three and a half million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, AP Central, APCD, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Vertical Teams, Pre-AP, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. Admitted Class Evaluation Service, CollegeEd, Connect to college success, MyRoad, SAT Professional Development, SAT Readiness Program, and Setting the Cornerstones are trademarks owned by the College Entrance Examination Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Permission to use copyrighted College Board materials may be requested online at: http://www.collegeboard.com/inquiry/cbpermit.html. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP Central is the official online home for the AP Program and Pre-AP: apcentral.collegeboard.com. 2005 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part A (Suggested writing time—45 minutes) Percent of Section II score—45 Directions: The following question requires you to construct a coherent essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents A-J and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. High scores will be earned only by essays that both cite key pieces of evidence from the documents and draw on outside knowledge of the period. 1. To what extent did the American Revolution fundamentally change American society? In your answer, be sure to address the political, social, and economic effects of the Revolution in the period from 1775 to 1800. Document A Source: Woodcut of Patriot woman, Marblehead, MA, 1779 (New-York Historical Society). Copyright © 2005 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2 2005 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document B Source: Pennsylvania Packet, 1779. Awake, Americans, to a sense of your danger. No time to be lost. Instantly banish every Tory from among you. Let America be sacred alone to freemen. Drive far from you every baneful wretch who wishes to see you fettered with the chains of tyranny. Send them where they may enjoy their beloved slavery to perfection— send them to the island of Britain; there let them drink the cup of slavery and eat the bread of bitterness all the days of their existence— there let them drag out a painful life, despised and accursed by those very men whose cause they have had the wickedness to espouse. Never let them return to this happy land— never let them taste the sweets of that independence which they strove to prevent. Banishment, perpetual banishment, should be their lot. Document C Source: Message to Congress from the Chickasaw Chiefs, July 1783. When our great father the King of England called away his warriors, he told us to take your People by the hand as friends and brothers. . . . It makes our hearts rejoice to find that our great father, and his children the Americans have at length made peace, which we wish may continue as long as the Sun and Moon. And to find that our Brothers the Americans are inclined to take us by the hand, and smoke with us at the great fire, which we hope will never be extinguished. Document D Source: Statutes at Large of Virginia, 1786. Be it enacted by the general Assembly, that no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place, or ministry whatsoever . . . but that all men shall be free to profess, and by argument to maintain, their opinion in matters of religion. Document E Source: United Indian Nations, Speech at the Confederate Council, 1786. Brethren of the United States of America: It is now more than three years since peace was made between the King of Great Britain and you, but we, the Indians, were disappointed, finding ourselves not included in that peace . . . for we thought that its conclusion would have promoted a friendship between the United States and the Indians. . . . You kindled your council fires where you thought proper, without consulting us, at which you held separate treaties and have entirely neglected our plan of having a general conference with the different nations of the confederacy. Copyright © 2005 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 3 2005 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document F Source: Medal of the Philadelphia Society for the Promotion of Agriculture, 1786. Copyright © 2005 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 4 2005 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document G Source: Letter from Abigail Adams to Thomas Jefferson, 1787. With regard to the tumults in my native state, which you inquire about, I wish I could say that report had exaggerated them. It is too true Sir, that they have been carried to so alarming a height as to stop the courts of justice in several counties. Ignorant, restless desperados, without conscience or principles, have led a deluded multitude to follow their standard, under pretense of grievances which have no existence but in their imaginations. Some of them were crying out for a paper currency, some for an equal distribution of property. Document H Source: An Ordinance for the Government of the Territory of the United States Northwest of the River Ohio, 1787. Article 6th. There shall be neither slavery nor involuntary servitude in the said territory, otherwise than in the punishment of crimes whereof the party shall have been duly convicted: Provided, always, That any person escaping into the same, from whom labor or service is lawfully claimed in any one of the original States, such fugitive may be lawfully reclaimed and conveyed to the person claiming his or her labor or service as aforesaid. Document I Source: James Madison in The Federalist, number 51, 1788. Ambition must be made to counteract ambition. . . . It may be a reflection on human nature that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government. But what is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature? If men were angels, no government would be necessary. . . . In framing a government which is to be administered by men over men, the great difficulty lies in this: you must first enable the government to control the governed; and in the next place oblige it to control itself. Document J Source: Molly Wallace, valedictory address, Young Ladies’ Academy of Philadelphia, 1792. What then must my situation be, when my sex, my youth and inexperience all conspire to make me tremble at the task which I have undertaken? But the friendly encouragement, which I behold in almost every countenance, enables me to overcome difficulties, that would otherwise be insurmountable. With some, however, it has been made a question, whether we ought ever to appear in so public a manner. Our natural timidity, the domestic situation to which, by nature and custom we seem destined, are urged as arguments against what I now have undertaken: Many sarcastical observations have been handed out against female oratory: But to what do they amount? Do they not plainly inform us, that, because we are females, we ought therefore to be deprived of what is perhaps the most effectual means of acquiring a just, natural and graceful delivery? No one will pretend to deny, that we should be taught to read in the best manner. And if to read, why not to speak? END OF DOCUMENTS FOR QUESTION 1 Copyright © 2005 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). 5 2005 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part B and Part C (Suggested total planning and writing time—70 minutes) Percent of Section II score—55 Part B Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 2. Compare and contrast the ways in which economic development affected politics in Massachusetts and Virginia in the period from 1607 to 1750. 3. To what extent did the debates about the Mexican War and its aftermath reflect the sectional interests of New Englanders, westerners, and southerners in the period from 1845 to 1855 ? Copyright © 2005 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 6 2005 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Part C Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 4. Describe the patterns of immigration in TWO of the periods listed below. Compare and contrast the responses of Americans to immigrants in these periods. 1820 to 1860 1880 to 1924 1965 to 2000 5. Analyze the extent to which TWO of the following transformed American society in the 1960’s and 1970’s. The Civil Rights movement The antiwar movement The women’s movement END OF EXAMINATION Copyright © 2005 by College Entrance Examination Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for AP students and parents). 7 ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2009 for the course OC 9876 taught by Professor Dq during the Spring '09 term at UC Merced.

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