ap05_sg_us_history_form_b

ap05_sg_us_history_form_b - AP® United States History 2005...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: AP® United States History 2005 Scoring Guidelines Form B The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 4,700 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves over three and a half million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, AP Central, APCD, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Vertical Teams, Pre-AP, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Entrance Examination Board. Admitted Class Evaluation Service, CollegeEd, Connect to college success, MyRoad, SAT Professional Development, SAT Readiness Program, and Setting the Cornerstones are trademarks owned by the College Entrance Examination Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Entrance Examination Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Permission to use copyrighted College Board materials may be requested online at: http://www.collegeboard.com/inquiry/cbpermit.html. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP Central is the official online home for the AP Program and Pre-AP: apcentral.collegeboard.com. AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 1—Document-Based Question In the early nineteenth century, Americans sought to resolve their political disputes through compromise, yet by 1860 this no longer seemed possible. Analyze the reasons for this change. Use the documents and your knowledge of the period 1820–1860 in constructing your response. The 8–9 Essay • Contains a well-developed thesis that analyzes the issues that confronted the American people in the antebellum era and the attempts at compromise. • Offers an analysis of why those efforts succeeded or failed. • Effectively uses a substantial number of documents. • Supports the thesis with substantial and relevant outside information. • Is clearly organized and well written. • May contain minor errors. The 5–7 Essay • Contains a thesis that analyzes the issues and presents some attempts at compromise. • Offers a limited analysis of why those efforts succeeded or failed. • Effectively uses some documents. • Supports the thesis with some relevant outside information. • Demonstrates acceptable organization and writing. • May have errors that do not seriously detract from the essay’s quality. The 2–4 Essay • Contains a limited or undeveloped thesis. • Deals with the question in a general manner; has a simplistic treatment of the topic; or addresses the issue of compromise in a limited way in terms of either chronology or topical focus. • Merely refers to, quotes, or briefly cites the documents. • Contains little or no outside information. • Demonstrates weak organization and writing. • May have major errors. The 0–1 Essay • Contains no thesis or a thesis that does not address the question. • Exhibits inadequate or incorrect understanding of the question. • Has little or no understanding of the documents or ignores them. • Is poorly written—inhibits comprehension of the essay. • Has numerous errors. The — Essay • Is blank or completely off task. Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 2 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 1 Document Information and Inferences Document A: Henry Clay, speech to the Senate, February 12, 1833 • Says it is “impracticable” for South Carolina to nullify a federal law successfully. • Says that South Carolina does not intend to secede from the Union. Document B: Annual report of the American Anti-Slavery Society, 1834 • Condemns slave owners as “man stealers.” • Demands immediate and uncompensated emancipation. • Asserts that laws endorsing slavery are contrary to God’s law and therefore invalid. • Admits Congress cannot interfere with slavery in the states but can end the interstate slave trade and slavery in the territories. Document C: Resolution of Pinckney Committee, House of Representatives, May 18, 1836 • “Gag rule” immediately tables antislavery petitions in the House of Representatives. Document D: Daniel Webster, speech to the Senate Speech, March 7, 1850 • Speaks as an “American” (nationalist) not a sectional representative. • Admits that the North has not complied with the Fugitive Slave Law; they should! • Strongly opposed to secession—“a moral impossibility.” Document E: “Southern Chivalry: Argument vs. Club’s” • Drawing of the caning of Sen. Charles Sumner (Massachusetts) by Rep. Preston Brooks (South Carolina) in the Senate in May 1856 (note “Kansas” document in his hand). • Sympathetic to Sumner (showing prostrate and bleeding); men laughing in background. Document F: Muscogee, Georgia, Herald, quoted in the New York Tribune, September 10, 1856 • Verbal attack on the ill-bred, ill-mannered working classes and small farmers of the North in comparison to the gentlemen of the South. • Northerners are “hardly fit” for association with their southern compatriots. Document G: Abraham Lincoln, speech at Alton, Illinois, October 15, 1858 • Rejects often made argument that slavery agitation is just the product of ambitious politicians. • Argues that slavery goes beyond politics—impacts religion, literature, and morals to excite and divide the society. Document H: Map of the Presidential Election of 1860 • Lincoln/Republican win all the “free” states except New Jersey—have an electoral majority (180) but only a plurality of the popular vote. • Democrats divided: Stephen Douglas wins only in Missouri/New Jersey (12 electoral). John Breckinridge wins deep South (72 electoral votes). • Constitutional Union Party (John Bell) wins upper South (39 electoral votes). Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 3 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 1 Outside Information Missouri Compromise, 1819–1821 The Issue: Extension of slavery into the western territories Compromise/Resolution: • Louisiana Purchase divided by 36°30' line • Missouri as a slave state; Maine as a free state Related Information: • Tallmadge amendment to free slaves at age 25 does not pass • Henry Clay, Speaker of the House, as engineer • Jefferson views the compromise negatively; “a firebell in the night” • Second Great Awakening Tariff/Nullification Controversy, 1828–1833 The Issues: • High tariff levels threaten southern cotton exports • Can the federal government legally impose protective tariffs? Compromise/Resolution: Tariff of 1832 reduced over a period of 10 years by a new tariff in 1833 Related Information: • “Tariff of Abominations,” 1828 (45%–50% rates) • John C. Calhoun, South Carolina Exposition and Protest, 1828 (advocates nullification) • Andrew Jackson’s modified Tariff of 1832 (33% rates) • South Carolina nullifies tariff—November 1832 • Jackson threatens South Carolina—passage of Force Bill, March 1833 • Clay engineers Compromise Tariff of March 1833 (reduce rates to 20% by 1842) Antislavery Debate in Congress, 1836–1844 The Issue: Can/should Congress legislate matters related to slavery and its abolition? Compromise/Resolution: Passage (yearly) of “gag rules” that immediately tabled petitions presented by Congressmen that related to slavery Related Information: • Rise of abolition societies to champion antislavery • William Lloyd Garrison/Liberator • Southern control of Congress and the White House • Liberty Party • Positive defense of slavery Compromise of 1850, 1846–1850 The Issues: • What should the slave status be of lands gained from the Mexican War? • What should be done to enforce the Fugitive Slave Law? • Should slaves be traded publicly in Washington, D.C.? Compromise/Resolution: • California admitted as a free state; New Mexico and Utah territories with popular sovereignty • A new and stronger Fugitive Slave Law passed • The public slave trade in Washington, D.C., would cease Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 4 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 1 Outside Information (continued) Related Information: • Mexican War (land gains in Southwest and California) • Wilmot Proviso (free soil) • Popular sovereignty • Calhoun’s “joint and common property” doctrine • Election of 1848 (Taylor victory, rise of Free Soil Party) • Henry Clay/Stephen A. Douglas/John C. Calhoun • Harriet B. Stowe, Uncle Tom’s Cabin (1852) Slavery in the Kansas–Nebraska territories, 1854–1858 The Issue: Should slavery, prohibited by the Missouri Compromise, be extended into the Kansas and Nebraska territories? Compromise/Resolution: “Lecompton Constitution” referred back to the voters of Kansas (English Bill, 1858) by Congress where it is overwhelmingly rejected Related Information: • Southern need for expansion of slavery into the territories/added slave states • Stephen A. Douglas/formation of territories under popular sovereignty • Repeal of the Missouri Compromise • “Bleeding Kansas”/John Brown • “Crime Against Kansas” speech by Charles Sumner • Rise of the sectional, free soil Republican Party • Election of 1856/James Buchanan victory • Proslavery “Lecompton Constitution” passed by Kansas legislature/Dred Scott • Congress refers the document back to Kansas voters (English Bill) • John Brown’s Raid at Harper’s Ferry Election of 1860, 1860–1861 The Issue: Can the Union be preserved if a sectional antislavery party emerges victorious? Compromise/Resolution: Efforts made after Lincoln’s victory to hold the Union together—Crittenden Compromise (extend the 36°30' line to the California border) rejected by Lincoln and Republicans. Related Information: • Increased southern sense of alienation; economic and cultural superiority • Impending Crisis • Threat posed by the Republicans to slavery • Splintering of the Democratic Party in 1860 • Abraham Lincoln’s nomination as a moderate Republican Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 5 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 2 “Geography was the primary factor in shaping the development of the British colonies in North America.” Assess the validity of this statement for the 1600’s. The 8–9 Essay • Contains a clear, well-developed thesis that evaluates two areas (New England, the Middle Atlantic, the South) in depth or three areas more broadly. • Supports the thesis with substantial, specific, relevant information. • Is well organized and well written. • May contain minor errors. The 5–7 Essay • Presents a thesis that addresses two of the three geographic areas, and/or may be imbalanced. • Supports the thesis with some specific, relevant information. • Has acceptable organization and writing. • May contain errors that do not seriously detract from the overall quality of the essay. The 24 Essay • Lacks a thesis or contains a confused or unfocused thesis that may deal with one area superficially. • Provides minimal relevant information of simply states the facts. • Has little or no analysis; may contain generalizations OR may address only one geographic area. • May be poorly organized and/or poorly written. • May contain major errors. The 0–1 Essay • Lacks a thesis or simply restates the question. • Demonstrates an incompetent or inappropriate response. • Contains no analysis. • Is poorly organized and poorly written. • Contains substantial factual errors. The — Essay • Is blank or completely off task. Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 6 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 2 Outside Information NEW ENGLAND Impact of cold winters Short growing season Rocky soil Few major ports: Boston Failure of initial settlements in Maine (Kennebec) Population grows more slowly in New England Puritans and impact of religion rather than economics Produce: lumber, fish, naval stores Labor force: domestic River system/trade MIDDLE ATLANTIC Moderate winters Longer growing season Major ports: New York, Philadelphia Slow population growth Produce: grains Labor force: indentured servants Mountains: western expansion/Indians River system/trade SOUTH Warm climate Long growing season Major ports: Baltimore, Norfolk, Charleston, Savannah Rapid population growth Produce: tobacco, rice, indigo, cotton Labor force: indentured servants/slaves Mountains: westward expansion/Indians River system/trade Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 7 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 3 To what extent was the United States Constitution a radical departure from the Articles of Confederation? The 8–9 Essay • Contains a clear, well-developed thesis that focuses upon the notion of “radical departure” and covers both documents. • Supports the thesis with substantial, specific, and relevant information. • Is well organized and well written. • May contain minor errors. The 5–7 Essay • Presents a thesis that explores the “radical departure” and covers both documents; may be imbalanced. • Supports the thesis with some specific, relevant information. • Has acceptable organization and writing. • May contain errors that do not seriously detract from the overall quality of the essay. The 2–4 Essay • Lacks a thesis or contains a confused or unfocused thesis. • Provides minimal relevant information of simply states the facts. • Has little or no analysis; may contain generalizations OR may address only one document superficially. • May be poorly organized and/or poorly written. • May contain major errors. The 0–1 Essay • Lacks a thesis or simply restates the question. • Demonstrates an incompetent or inappropriate response. • Contains no analysis. • Is poorly organized and poorly written. • Contains substantial factual errors. The — Essay • Is blank or completely off task. Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 8 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 3 Outside Information Articles of Confederation Written in 1777 Becomes operational in 1781 Emphasis on states’ rights One-house Congress One state, one vote Need three-quarters for major legislation, unanimous to amend No executive, no judiciary Constitution Written in 1787 Becomes operational in 1789 Federal system Two-house Congress New Jersey/Virginia plans Elastic clause Elected President (indirect) Appointed federal judiciary Cannot tax Cannot regulate commerce Northwest Ordinance Shays’ Rebellion Revolutionary War debt/monetary supply Can tax Can regulate commerce No Bill of Rights Fugitives/Three-Fifths Compromise No liberty for Blacks/Women/Indians Whiskey Rebellion French influence Enlightenment Separation of powers/balance of powers Annapolis Convention Madison/Federalist Papers Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 9 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 4 How successful were progressive reforms during the period 1890 to 1915 with respect to TWO of the following? Industrial conditions Urban life Politics The 8–9 Essay • Contains a clear, well-developed thesis that evaluates the effect of progressive reforms on two aspects of American life in the period 1890 to 1915. • Supports the thesis with substantial, specific, and relevant information. • Presents a reasonably balanced thesis that effectively evaluates the effectiveness of progressive reform over the time frame. • May contain minor errors. • Is well organized and well written. The 5–7 Essay • Presents a thesis, which may be partially developed, that addresses the effect of progressive reforms on two aspects of American life in the period 1890 to 1915. • Supports the thesis with some specific, relevant information. • Has limited or unbalanced treatment of the impact of progressive reforms on two aspects of American life. • May contain errors that do not seriously detract from the overall quality of the essay. • Has acceptable organization and writing. The 2–4 Essay • Lacks a thesis or contains a confused or unfocused thesis that may not cover the entire time period. • Provides minimal relevant information or simply states facts. • Has little or no analysis; may contain only generalizations OR may address only one aspect of American life. • May contain major errors. • May be poorly organized and/or poorly written. The 0–1 Essay • Lacks a thesis or simply restates the question. • Demonstrates an incompetent or inappropriate response. • Contains no analysis. • Contains substantial factual errors. • Is poorly organized and poorly written. The — Essay • Is blank or completely off task. Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 10 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 4 Outside Information INDUSTRIAL CONDITIONS URBAN LIFE Poor wages, hours, and working conditions Growing population in cities Brooklyn Bridge Homestead Strike Henry Clay Frick Andrew Carnegie Great White City Immigrant work force Madison Grant Social Darwinism Gospel of Wealth Horatio Alger Taylorism Sherman Anti-Trust Act U.S. v. E.C. Knight Pinkertons Pullman Strike Eugene Debs American Railway Union Richard Olney Grover Cleveland American Federation of Labor Samuel Gompers Panic of 1893 Booker T. Washington W.E.B. DuBois Brownsville Raid Lochner v. New York Women at work Muller v. Oregon Children at work IWW Anthracite Coal Strike Theodore Roosevelt Jacob Riis How the Other Half Lives Skyscraper Tenements Great White City Fifth Avenue, Beacon Hill Crime Pollution Salvation Army Department Stores Coney Island Baseball Public education Settlement House Movement Jane Addams Hull House The New Woman Club Women Triangle Shirt Waist Fire Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 11 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 4 Outside Information (continued) POLITICS William McKinley William Jennings Bryan Election of 1896 Muckrakers Upton Sinclair The Jungle Lincoln Steffens McClure’s magazine Shame of the Cities City Manager Plan Tammany Hall George Washington Plunkitt WCTU Jane Addams Florence Kelley Carrie Chapman Catt Alice Paul Nineteenth Amendment Tom Johnson Golden Rule Jones Robert LaFollette Initiative Secret Ballot Referendum Recall Primary Sixteenth Amendment Seventeenth Amendment Eighteenth Amendment NAACP Guinn v. United States Theodore Roosevelt Square Deal Pure Food and Drug Act Conservation William Howard Taft Pinchot–Ballinger Dispute Woodrow Wilson Underwood-Simmons Tariff Clayton Anti-Trust Act Federal Trade Commission Federal Reserve Act Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 12 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 5 Analyze the ways in which TWO of the following contributed to the changes in women’s lives in the midtwentieth century. Wars Literature and/or popular culture Medical and/or technological advances The 8–9 Essay • Contains a clear, well-developed thesis that analyzes the ways in which women’s lives in midtwentieth century U.S. were changed by two of the following: wars, literature and/or popular culture, and medical and/or technological advances. • Supports the thesis with substantial, specific, and relevant information. • Presents a reasonably balanced thesis that effectively evaluates the impact of two factors on women’s lives. • May contain minor errors. • Is well organized and well written. The 5–7 Essay • Presents a thesis, which may be partially developed, that addresses the effect of two of the following: wars, literature and/or popular culture, and medical and/or technological advances on women in mid-twentieth century U.S. • Supports the thesis with some specific, relevant information. • Has a limited or unbalanced treatment of the impact of the two factors on women’s lives. • May contain errors that do not seriously detract from the overall quality of the essay. • Has acceptable organization and writing. The 2–4 Essay • Lacks a thesis or contains a confused or unfocused thesis that may not cover the entire time period. • Provides minimal relevant information or simply states facts. • Has little or no analysis; may contain only generalizations OR may address only one factor in changing women’s lives. • May contain major errors. • May be poorly organized and/or poorly written. The 0–1 Essay • Lacks a thesis or simply restates the question. • Demonstrates an incompetent or inappropriate response. • Contains no analysis. • Contains substantial factual errors. • Is poorly organized and poorly written. The — Essay • Is blank or completely off task. Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 13 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY 2005 SCORING GUIDELINES (Form B) Question 5 Outside Information WARS WAACs, WAVES Rosie the Riveter Six million women took jobs during World War II Created new jobs in postwar era Day care centers After war two-thirds of women left labor market Postwar rush to domesticity Still segregation of women Good-bye babies Baby Boomers Rising divorce rate Opposition to Vietnam War pushed some women to left MEDICAL/TECHNOLOGICAL Automobile Electricity Inexpensive clothing Kitchen appliances such as dishwasher Access to contraception The pill Abortion LITERATURE AND/OR POPULAR CULTURE Alice Walker—The Color Purple Toni Morrison—Beloved Gish Jen—Mona in the Promised Land Zora Neale Hurston—Their Eyes Were Watching God Betty Friedan—Feminine Mystique Kate Millett—Sexual Politics Boston Women’s Health Collective—Our Bodies, Ourselves Folk Music Revival “I Am Woman” Joan Baez Beatles All in the Family Woodstock Copyright © 2005 by College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 14 ...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online