ap06_frq_us_history

ap06_frq_us_history - AP® United States History 2006...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® United States History 2006 Free-Response Questions The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 5,000 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement Program® (AP®). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, AP Central, APCD, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Vertical Teams, Pre-AP, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. Admitted Class Evaluation Service, CollegeEd, connect to college success, MyRoad, SAT Professional Development, SAT Readiness Program, and Setting the Cornerstones are trademarks owned by the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. All other products and services may be trademarks of their respective owners. Permission to use copyrighted College Board materials may be requested online at: www.collegeboard.com/inquiry/cbpermit.html. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP Central is the official online home for the AP Program: apcentral.collegeboard.com. 2006 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part A (Suggested writing time—45 minutes) Percent of Section II score—45 Directions: The following question requires you to construct a coherent essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents A-J and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. High scores will be earned only by essays that both cite key pieces of evidence from the documents and draw on outside knowledge of the period. 1. Discuss the changing ideals of American womanhood between the American Revolution (1770’s) and the outbreak of the Civil War. What factors fostered the emergence of “republican motherhood” and the “cult of domesticity”? Assess the extent to which these ideals influenced the lives of women during this period. In your answer be sure to consider issues of race and class. Use the documents and your knowledge of the time period in constructing your response. Document A Source: Letter written by a Philadelphia woman, 1776. I will tell you what I have done . . . I have retrenched every superfluous expense in my table and family; tea I have not drunk since last Christmas, nor bought a new cap or gown . . . [I] have learned to knit, and am now making stockings of American wool for my servants, and this way do I throw in my mite to the public good. I know this, that as free I can die but once, but as a slave I shall not be worthy of life. Document B Source: Benjamin Rush, Thoughts Upon Female Education, 1787. The equal share that every citizen has in the liberty, and the possible share he may have in the government of our country, make it necessary that our ladies should be qualified to a certain degree by a peculiar and suitable education, to concur in instructing their sons in the principles of liberty and government. © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 2 2006 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document C Document D Source: Letter written by a factory worker, 1839. April 4, 1839 Dear Sabrina, . . . You have been informed I suppose that I am a factory girl and that I am at Nashua and I have wished you were here too but I suppose your mother would think it far beneith [sic] your dignity to be a factory girl. Their [sic] are very many young Ladies at work in the factories that have given up milinary [sic] d[r]essmaking & s[c]hool keeping for to work in the mill. But I would not advise any one to do it for I was so sick of it at first I wished a factory had never been thought of. But the longer I stay the better I like and I think nothing unforsene [sic] calls me away I shall stay here till fall. . . . If you should have any idea of working in the factory I will do the best I can to get you a place with us. We have an excellent boarding place. We board with a family with whome [sic] I was acquainted with when I lived at Haverhill. Pleas [sic] write us soon and believe your affectionate Aunt M[alenda] M. Edwards © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 3 2006 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document E Source: Margaret Fuller, Woman in the Nineteenth Century, 1845. . . . We would have every arbitrary barrier thrown down. We would have every path laid open to Woman as freely as to Man. What woman needs is not as a woman to act or rule, but as a nature to grow, as an intellect to discern, as a soul to live freely and unimpeded, to unfold such powers as were given her when we left our common home. Too much is said of women being better educated, that they may become better companions and mothers for men. They should be fit for such companionship . . . Earth knows no fairer, holier relation than that of a mother . . . But a being of infinite scope must not be treated with an exclusive view to any one relation. Give the soul free course, let the organization, both of body and mind, be freely developed, and the being will be fit for any and every relation to which it may be called. Document F Source: Sarah Bagley, “The Ten Hour System and Its Advocates.” Voice of Industry, January 16, 1846. At one time they tell us that our “free institutions” are based upon the virtue and intelligence of the American people, and the influence of the mother, form and mould the man— and the next breath, that the way to make the mothers of the next generation virtuous is to enclose them within brick walls of a cotton mill from twelve and a half to thirteen and a half hours per day. Document G Source: “Woman, and the ‘Woman’s Movement.’” Putnam's monthly magazine of American literature, science and art, March 1853. ... She has ever been the casket of his privacy, the shield of his true individuality, the guardian of his essential humanity, keeping it bright and unsullied ... Woman is by nature inferior to man. She is his inferior in passion, his inferior in intellect, and his inferior in physical strength. In ascribing to woman a natural inferiority to man, we by no means seek to depress her in the scale of being, but on the contrary to exalt her. It is this natural inequality of the sexes besides, which constitutes the true ground of their union, and enables woman to be the fountain of unmixed blessing she is to man. © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 4 2006 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document H Source: Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, published in 1861. I turned from him with disgust and hatred. But he was my master. I was compelled to live under the same roof with him— where I saw a man forty years my senior daily violating the most sacred commandments of nature. He told me I was his property; that I must be subject to his will in all things. My soul revolted against the mean tyranny. But where could I turn for protection? No matter whether the slave girl be as black as ebony or as fair as her mistress. In either case, there is no shadow of law to protect her from insult, from violence, or even from death; all these are inflicted by fiends who bear the shape of men. The mistress, who ought to protect the helpless victim, has no other feelings towards her but those of jealousy and rage . . . Document I Source: Letters written by a frontier woman in Iowa to relatives, 1861. John has hired a man to work for him this summer, hope I shall not have to do quite as much out doors. . . . The hired man left just as corn planting commenced so I shouldered my hoe and have worked out ever since and I guess my services are just as acceptable as his or will be in time . . . . I wore a dress with my sunbonnet wrung out in water every few minutes and my dress wet also this was all the clothing . . . I wore. © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 5 2006 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Document J Source: H. L. Stephens, The Parting, 1863. Library of Congress, Prints and Photographs Division. END OF DOCUMENTS FOR QUESTION 1 © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 6 2006 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part B and Part C (Suggested total planning and writing time—70 minutes) Percent of Section II score—55 Part B Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 2. Analyze the differences between the Spanish settlements in the Southwest and the English colonies in New England in the seventeenth century in terms of TWO of the following: Politics Religion Economic development 3. Explain why and how the role of the federal government changed as a result of the Civil War with respect to TWO of the following during the period 1861-1877: Race relations Economic development Westward expansion © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 7 2006 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Part C Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 4. Historians have argued that Progressive reform lost momentum in the 1920’s. Evaluate this statement with respect to TWO of the following. Regulation of business Labor Immigrants 5. While the United States appeared to be dominated by consensus and conformity in the 1950’s, some Americans reacted against the status quo. Analyze the critiques of United States society made by TWO of the following. Youth Civil Rights Activists Intellectuals STOP END OF EXAM © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). 8 ...
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2009 for the course OC 9876 taught by Professor Dq during the Spring '09 term at UC Merced.

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