ap07_us_hist_form_b_frq

ap07_us_hist_form_b_frq - AP® United States History 2007...

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Unformatted text preview: AP® United States History 2007 Free-Response Questions Form B The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the association is composed of more than 5,000 schools, colleges, universities, and other educational organizations. Each year, the College Board serves seven million students and their parents, 23,000 high schools, and 3,500 colleges through major programs and services in college admissions, guidance, assessment, financial aid, enrollment, and teaching and learning. Among its best-known programs are the SAT®, the PSAT/NMSQT®, and the Advanced Placement ® ® Program (AP ). The College Board is committed to the principles of excellence and equity, and that commitment is embodied in all of its programs, services, activities, and concerns. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. College Board, Advanced Placement Program, AP, AP Central, SAT, and the acorn logo are registered trademarks of the College Board. PSAT/NMSQT is a registered trademark of the College Board and National Merit Scholarship Corporation. Permission to use copyrighted College Board materials may be requested online at: www.collegeboard.com/inquiry/cbpermit.html. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.com. AP Central is the official online home for the AP Program: apcentral.collegeboard.com. 2007 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part A (Suggested writing time—45 minutes) Percent of Section II score—45 Directions: The following question requires you to construct a coherent essay that integrates your interpretation of Documents A-H and your knowledge of the period referred to in the question. High scores will be earned only by essays that both cite key pieces of evidence from the documents and draw on outside knowledge of the period. 1. In what ways did the administration of President Lyndon B. Johnson respond to the political, economic, and social problems of the United States? Assess the effectiveness of these responses. Use the documents and your knowledge of the period 1960-1970 to construct your response. Document A Source: Abraham Ribicoff, secretary of health, education, and welfare, testifying before the House of Representatives, July 1961. With life spans lengthened, with medical science breaking into undreamed realms of discovery, the nation’s aged now face another aspect of insecurity: how to meet the mounting costs of health care. Document B Source: Lyndon B. Johnson, message to Congress, March 16, 1964. Because it is right, because it is wise, and because, for the first time in our history, it is possible to conquer poverty, I submit, for the consideration of the Congress and the country, the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. The act does not merely expand old programs or improve what is already being done. It charts a new course. It strikes at the causes, not just the consequences, of poverty. It can be a milestone in our 180-year search for a better life for our people. This act . . . will give almost half a million underprivileged young Americans the opportunity to develop skills, continue education, and find useful work; it will give every American community the opportunity to develop a comprehensive plan to fight its own poverty—and help them carry out their plans; . . . it will give many workers and farmers the opportunity to break through particular barriers which bar their escape from poverty. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -2- 2007 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document C Source: Stokely Carmichael, “What We Want,” New York Review of Books, September 22, 1966. On May 3, five new county “freedom organizations” convened and nominated candidates for the offices of sheriff, tax assessor, members of the school boards. Their ballot symbol is the black panther: a bold beautiful animal, representing the strength and dignity of Black demands today. A man needs a black panther on his side when he and his family must endure—as hundreds of Alabamians have endured—loss of job, eviction, starvation, and sometimes death for political activity. He may also need a gun, and SNCC [Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee] reaffirms the right of Black men everywhere to defend themselves when threatened or attacked. As for initiating the use of violence, we hope that such programs as ours will make that unnecessary; but it is not for us to tell Black communities whether they can or cannot use any particular form of action to resolve their problems. Responsibility for the use of violence by Black men, whether in self-defense or initiated by them, lies with the White community. Document D Source: NOW Statement of Purpose, October 29, 1966. We, men and women who hereby constitute ourselves as the National Organization for Women, believe that the time has come for a new movement toward true equality for all women in America, and toward a fully equal partnership of the sexes, as part of the worldwide revolution of human rights now taking place within and beyond our national borders. The purpose of NOW is to take action to bring women into full participation in the mainstream of American society now, exercising all the privileges and responsibilities thereof in truly equal partnership with men . . . There is no civil rights movement to speak for women, as there has been for Negroes and victims of discrimination. The National Organization for Women must therefore begin to speak. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -3- 2007 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document E Source: Punch, 1967 Reproduced by permission of Punch Ltd. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -4- 2007 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document F Source: Lyndon B. Johnson, interview, 1967. How is it possible that all these people could be so ungrateful to me after I had given them so much? I tried to make it possible for every child of every color to grow up in a nice house, to eat a solid breakfast, to attend a decent school, and to get a good and lasting job. I asked so little in return. Just a little thanks. Just a little appreciation. That’s all. Document G Source: Letter from private citizen to Senator Sam Ervin of North Carolina, June 18, 1968. I’m sick of crime everywhere. I’m sick of riots. I’m sick of “poor” people demonstrations (black, white, red, yellow, purple, green or any other color!) . . . I’m sick of the U.S. Supreme Court ruling for the good of a very small part rather than the whole of our society . . . I’m sick of the lack of law enforcement . . . But most of all, I’m sick of constantly being kicked in the teeth for staying home, minding my own business, working steadily, paying my bills and taxes, raising my children to be decent citizens, managing my financial affairs so I will not become a ward of the City, County, or State, and footing the bill for the minuses mentioned herein. © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -5- 2007 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Document H Source: United States Department of Commerce Census Bureau. Percentage of Persons Below Poverty Level by Racial Categories Year All Non-Whites Blacks Whites 1959 53.3 55.1 18.1 1966 39.8 41.8 11.3 1967 37.2 39.3 11.0 1968 33.5 34.7 10.0 1969 31.0 32.2 9.5 1970 32.0 33.5 9.9 1971 30.9 32.5 9.9 1972 31.9 33.3 9.0 1973 29.6 31.4 8.4 1974 29.5 31.4 8.9 END OF DOCUMENTS FOR QUESTION 1 © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -6- 2007 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) UNITED STATES HISTORY SECTION II Part B and Part C (Suggested total planning and writing time—70 minutes) Percent of Section II score—55 Part B Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 2. The French and Indian War (1754-1763) altered the relationship between Britain and its North American colonies. Assess this change with regard to TWO of the following in the period between 1763 and 1775. Land acquisition Politics Economics 3. Compare the experiences of TWO of the following groups of immigrants during the period 1830 to 1860. English Irish German © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -7- 2007 AP® UNITED STATES HISTORY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS (Form B) Part C Directions: Choose ONE question from this part. You are advised to spend 5 minutes planning and 30 minutes writing your answer. Cite relevant historical evidence in support of your generalizations and present your arguments clearly and logically. 4. Explain how TWO of the following individuals responded to the economic and social problems created by industrialization during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Jane Addams Andrew Carnegie Samuel Gompers Upton Sinclair 5. Analyze the ways in which the federal government sought support on the home front for the war effort during the First World War. STOP END OF EXAM © 2007 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). -8- ...
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