_ap06_frq_chemistry

You must include a calculation as part of your answer

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Unformatted text preview: d above to show why a precipitate does not form. You must include a calculation as part of your answer. © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 6 2006 AP® CHEMISTRY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Answer EITHER Question 2 below OR Question 3 printed on page 8. Only one of these two questions will be graded. If you start both questions, be sure to cross out the question you do not want graded. The Section II score weighting for the question you choose is 20 percent. CO(g) + 1 O (g) → CO2(g) 22 2. The combustion of carbon monoxide is represented by the equation above. (a) Determine the value of the standard enthalpy change, DH rxn , for the combustion of CO(g) at 298 K using the following information. C(s) + 1 O (g) → CO(g) 22 DH 2 98 = − 110.5 kJ mol−1 DH 2 98 = − 393.5 kJ mol−1 C(s) + O2(g) → CO2(g) (b) Determine the value of the standard entropy change, DSrxn , for the combustion of CO(g) at 298 K using the information in the following table. S2 98 Substance (J mol−1 K−1) CO(g) 197.7 CO2(g) 213.7 O2(g) 205.1 (c) Determine the standard free energy change, DGrxn , for the reaction at 298 K. Include units with your answer. (d) Is the reaction spontaneous under standard conditions at 298 K ? Justify your answer. (e) Calculate the value of the equilibrium constant, Keq , for the reaction at 298 K. © 2006 The College Board. All rights reserved. Visit apcentral.collegeboard.com (for AP professionals) and www.collegeboard.com/apstudents (for students and parents). GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 7 2006 AP® CHEMISTRY FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS 3. Answer the following questions that relate to the analysis of chemical compounds. (a) A compound containing the elements C , H , N , and O is analyzed. When a 1.2359 g sample is burned in excess oxygen, 2.241 g of CO2(g) is formed. The combustion analysis also showed that the sample contained 0....
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This note was uploaded on 10/01/2009 for the course OC 9876 taught by Professor Dq during the Spring '09 term at UC Merced.

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