Battle of the Heavyweights

Battle of the Heavyweights - Potter Battle of the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Potter Battle of the Heavyweights Rousseau vs. Locke vs. Smith By Hing Potter Political Science 141: Human Situation Spring 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Potter Hing Potter Tyler Rayne POLSC 141 Essay Assgmt# 2 23 Mar. 2011 Battle of the Heavyweights Rousseau vs. Locke vs. Smith In discussing the human situation within the context of its relationship to civil society, we can look towards John Locke, Adam Smith and Jean-Jacques Rousseau for insight. All three, considered to be classical heavyweights of modern day political science, helped to construct and guide civil society into what it is today and how the individual has developed from a primitive nature through evolution of society. However, not all three heavyweights conclude with the same message of development of man in society with regards to freedom and independence. In looking at Locke, Smith and Rousseau, we can see that is a difference of opinion of man’s freedom and independence from the development from a natural state of nature to a sophisticated state of civil society. Further, I will offer a personal opinion extracting views from all three in regards to human independence and freedom. Rousseau’s writings point to the fact that we are all independent and free, but only in the state of nature, where the only need to associate with others is to mate. Rousseau states, “…man had everything he needed in order to live in the state of nature; in a cultivated reason, he has only what he needs to live in society” (Rousseau pg. 52). Naturally, we are animals fueled by basic passions of self-preservation for ourselves and pity for others. But within these passions we construct basic collectives, an ideal state, of lodging and language. Lodging provides a roof over
Background image of page 2
Potter our heads and language gives us the capability to communicate with one another. However, beyond the state of nature, we also require food, which brings us down the path of interaction and association with the public within the self-constructed civil society. It’s because of food, that agriculture is necessary and it is because of agriculture that tools, metallurgy, are required for supporting the production of food. Through agriculture and metallurgy, we require labor, which demands an increase in population growth to support the efforts. However, within that labor we see a division of people where some will become farmers while some will become producers of
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/16/2011 for the course POLITICAL 131 taught by Professor Yenor during the Spring '11 term at Boise State.

Page1 / 7

Battle of the Heavyweights - Potter Battle of the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online