Formal Analysis I

Formal Analysis I - 1 Primitive Existence: Karel Appel Men...

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Primitive Existence: Karel Appel Men and Animals 1952 Rebecca Ney ‘11 Karel Appel’s painting titled Men and Animals 1952 plunges into the elemental and primitive. Appel painted his abstract yet focused figures with oil paint on burlap. This foundation resonates with the natural motif of a primal coexistence of men and animals; both survive within nature. The burlap has a white layer of paint over it in creating a distinct location for mutual existence beyond that of the burlap. Furthermore, the frame in which the canvas is set is made of wood. This also allows for a natural surrounding and environment, as it is self-contained within a natural frame. Appel places four figures onto a gray, almost cell-like patch that fades out to the bottom of the painting with black containing and surrounding it. This is another method in which he depicts the same living space between humans and animals, yet still with room to break this boundary through the fading gray. The largest figure contains the defining characteristics of a human with two upright legs, head, hair, one distinct hand with fingers, and a body. The fingers on the hand are outlined in blue with lines as though a child had drawn it. The colors contained within the black outlining are mostly primary. The bright yellow is the loudest color in the entire painting, and draws the observer’s eyes up into this left hand corner. The remainder of the figure contains mostly primary
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Formal Analysis I - 1 Primitive Existence: Karel Appel Men...

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