Soft_Beverages_3

Soft_Beverages_3 - Soft Beverages SARAH JOSEF HM 324...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Soft Beverages SARAH JOSEF HM 324
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
American Beverages Overview 1. Pre-colonization - Native American Beverages 2. 1650 – Tea 3. 1774 – Coffee 4. 1810 – Imitation Mineral Water Patent 5. 1819 – Soda Fountain 6. 1832 – Carbonated beverages, “Soda” 7. 1858 – Marble “Soda Fountain” in Pharmacies 8. 1876 – Root Beer (Hires) 9. 1885 – Dr. Pepper 10. 1886 – Coca Cola 11. 1898 – Pepsi Cola 12. 1907 – Ginger Ale (1851 Ireland) 13. 1916 – Orange Crush 14. 1927 – Kool-Aid 15. 1929 – 7-UP 16. 1971 – Starbucks 17. 1970’s – Bottled Water 18. 1985 - Energy Drinks
Background image of page 2
Native American Beverage – Pre-Colonization Honey Drink Mint Tea Sassafras Tea Juniper Tea Apricot Drink Manzanita Berry Juice
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tea Pre-American History China 2000+ years ago Evergreen family, Camellia shrub Three Major Types (Methods of Producing) Green, Oolong, Black
Background image of page 4
Green Tea 1. “Wither” fresh leaves in warm air 2. Break up leaves to expose essential oils (flavor) 3. “Fire” (heat) Maintains Green or light brown color **How Americans primarily drank tea until 1830 Popular today for health benefits Vitamin C & Antioxidants
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Black Tea Prepared same as Green Tea except expose leaves to air for longer time Oxidation changes color to black Essential oils change flavor Tannins develop Primarily from India British & Americans adopt as major type
Background image of page 6
Oolong Tea Leaves not exposed to air as long as with Black Tea Less oxidation of essential oils Develops different flavor Produced in China & Taiwan Taiwan formally Formosa Oolong AKA: Formosa Tea
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tea Produced today in: China Japan India Sri Lanka Parts of Africa South Carolina
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/16/2011 for the course HTM 324 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at S.F. State.

Page1 / 28

Soft_Beverages_3 - Soft Beverages SARAH JOSEF HM 324...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online