soc101-family_032410

soc101-family_032410 - Family Soc 101: Introduction to...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Family Soc 101: Introduction to Sociology Wednesday March 24, 2010 What is a family? A group of people related by ancestry, marriage, or adoption, who form a cooperative economic unit and care for the young and each other. Members consider their identity to be closely attached the group, and are committed to maintaining the group over time. What is family (cont’d)? A social institution. Reflects persistent subgroup inequalities. Influenced by other social institutions, including economy, law, and education. Changing family patterns and forms “emerge in response to social conditions…and in turn, shape the future direction of society.” Structural and cultural influences U.S. Households, by Composition Sources: U.S. Census Bureau, 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Single mom Single dad Two parents Living Arrangements of Children under Age 18, 1950-2000 Divorces Per 100 Marrages, 1950-2000 (Source: National Center for Health Statistics) 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 1998 Year Number of divorces per 100 marriages Divorces per 100 marrages Example #1, Fertility Patterns General patterns Birth rates very low during the Depression era (early 1930s), peaked in mid-1940s through early 1960s, thus creating large Baby Boom. Persons born in Depression had roughly 3.7 children at mid-century. Baby Boomers had only 1.8-2.0 kids in the 1970s and forward. Median Age at First Marriage, 1950-2000 (Source: U.S. Census Bureau) 22.8 22.8 23.2 24.7 26.1 26.8 20.3 20.3 20.8 22 23.9 25.1 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 29 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 Year Median Age at First Marriage Men Women Trends in Childbearing Preferences and Total Fertility Rates: "Ideal Number of Children a Family Should Have" versus Actual Number of Babies Born per Woman, 1941-2004 (Sources: Gallup Organization and Census Bureau)...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 10/16/2011 for the course SOCIOLOGY 101 taught by Professor Clarke during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 26

soc101-family_032410 - Family Soc 101: Introduction to...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online