soc101-self-soc_0210-021510

soc101-self-soc_0210-021510 - Soc 101: Introduction to...

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Wednesday February 10, 2010 and Monday February 15, 2010 Methods (cont’d) and Soc 101: Introduction to Sociology
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I. Socialization A. What is it? B. Outcomes 1. Gender roles a. Influence of parents b. Influence of schools/teachers c. Influence of peers 2. Racial socialization a. Influences of above socializing agents
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Controversy: How much do socialization agents matter?
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Socialization (cont’d) 2. Moral development a. What is it? b. Sources of influence c. Piaget’s study d. Kohlberg’s model of moral development i. Six stages ii. Gilligan’s critique
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Kohlberg Model of Moral Development 1. Preconventional morality - moral judgment is based on rewards/punishments Stage 1 : Obey the rules to avoid punishment Stage 2: Obey the rules to get reward 2. Conventional morality - moral judgments are based on social consequences of act Stage 3 : Conform to the rules that are defined by others’ approval or disapproval Stage 4: Rigid conformity to society’s rules 3. Postconventional morality - moral judgments are based on internal ethical principles Stage 5: Rules may be changed for better alternatives Stage 6: behavior should conform to internal principles
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Socialization C. Subgroup differences 1. Historical differences a. Alwin v. Middletown studies 2. Social class contrasts a. Baumrind typology b. Bowles & Gintiss theory
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Parental values for children If you had to choose, which thing on this list would you pick as the most important for a child to learn to prepare him for life? To obey To be well-liked or popular To think for himself To work hard To help others when they need help To be religious Which comes next in importance? Which comes third….?
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Mean ranks (range: 1-5) of parental values for children, 1958-1983
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Subgroup differences in importance of value (range: 1-5), 1983
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Values change over time 1920s: To be religious 1950s: To obey 1970s: To think for himself 2000s: ???????????
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Baumrind’s Childrearing Typology High Warmth Low Warmth High Control Authoritative Authoritarian Low Control Permissive
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Bowles & Gintis’ correspondence theory
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I. Self A. What is it? 1. Self is the individual viewed as both the source
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This note was uploaded on 10/16/2011 for the course SOCIOLOGY 101 taught by Professor Clarke during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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soc101-self-soc_0210-021510 - Soc 101: Introduction to...

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