Vehicle Routing and Scheduling_Storage and Handling (1)

Vehicle Routing and Scheduling_Storage and Handling (1) -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A Brief Discussion on Vehicle Routing  and Scheduling Problems 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Routing with a Coincident Origin/Destination Point Typical of many single truck routing problems from a single depot. Mathematically, a complex problem to solve efficiently. However, good routes can be found by forming a route pattern where the paths do not cross - a “tear drop” pattern. CR (2004) Prentice Hall, Inc. Often referred to as the “traveling salesperson problem”. 2 D D Depot Depot (a) Poor routing-- paths cross (b) Good routing-- no paths cross
Background image of page 2
Traveling salesman problem: example Assume the distances are as follows: Your home base is Austin. In which order would you visit the 4 other cities? Austin Waco San Antonio Houston Dallas Austin 0 103 81 165 198 Waco 103 0 183 186 98 San Antonio 81 183 0 197 277 Houston 165 186 197 0 240 Dallas 198 98 277 240 0 3
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Multi-Vehicle Routing and Scheduling CR (2004) Prentice Hall, Inc. A problem similar to the single-vehicle routing problem except that a number of restrictions are placed on the problem. Chief among these are: - A mixture of vehicles with different capacities - Time windows on the stops - Pickups combined with deliveries - Total travel time for a vehicle - Vehicle operator breaks
Background image of page 4
5 Practical Guidelines for Good Routing and Scheduling 1. Load trucks with stop volumes that are in closest proximity to each other (a) Weak clustering Depot (b) Better clustering D D Depot Stops CR (2004) Prentice Hall, Inc.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Guidelines (Cont’d) 2. Stops on different days should be arranged to produce tight clusters F F F F F F F T T T T T T T D Depot F F F F F T T T F T F T T T D Depot (a) Weak clustering-- routes cross (b) Better clustering Stop May need to coordinate with sales to achieve clusters CR (2004) Prentice Hall, Inc.
Background image of page 6
7 Guidelines (Cont’d) 3. Build routes beginning with the farthest stop from the depot 4. The stop sequence on a route should form a
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/16/2011 for the course OM 368 taught by Professor Morrice during the Spring '11 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 24

Vehicle Routing and Scheduling_Storage and Handling (1) -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online