Gene Regulation

Gene Regulation - Gene Regulation Stephanie Chanthavong...

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Gene Regulation Stephanie Chanthavong Thursday Lab, Morrill Science Center III TA: Stephanie Zimmers, Lab No. 4 November 11, 2009
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ABSTRACT E. Coli feeds off of the monosaccharide glucose. The mechanism named Lac operon converts the disaccharide lactose into galactose and glucose for consumption by means of the gene Lac Z which produces an enzyme beta galactosidase. The purpose of the lab was to determine whether or not synthetic sugars such as aspartame, saccharine, and sucralose are capable of producing beta galactosidase. These three sugars, along with Lactose, Glucose, and Water as controls, were mixed in a solution of Wild type E. Coli. Using the spectrophotometer to measure the concentration of each solution, the results read that the synthetic sugars were successful in producing the enzyme beta galactosidase. However, the results were not completely accurate due to fault in the negative control solutions of glucose and water. INTRODUCTION Gene regulation is often studied in Escherichia coli (E. Coli). In the year 1959 Jacques Monod and Francois Jacob discovered that E. Coli combined with lactose creates an enzyme called beta galactosidase, which breaks down lactose into glucose and galactose, using glucose as an energy source for E. Coli (“Lac Operon”). The lac operon is a mechanism that allows the digestion of glucose in E. Coli. In E. Coli, the gene Lac Z is responsible for the translation of Beta
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Gene Regulation - Gene Regulation Stephanie Chanthavong...

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