Constitutional_Principles

Constitutional_Principles - SelectedConstitutionalPrinciples

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
GBL 395 – PART 3 FALL 2010 PROFESSOR HEIDI BULICH 1 Selected Constitutional Principles  (The Commerce Clause)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Commerce Clause 2 Article I, Section 8, Part 3 Congress shall have the power “[t]o regulate Commerce with  foreign Nations, and among the several States. . .” Seems simple enough – what does it mean?
Background image of page 2
Commerce Clause 3 The Commerce Clause  limits  ___Congress_____to the  regulation of  interstate  commerce. Local commerce and  intrastate  commerce is left to  the ____states_____to regulate.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Commerce Clause 4 Deciding what is and what is not interstate  commerce has been left up to the courts. Battles have occurred over: Federal intrusion into state and local commerce State and local regulation of interstate commerce  An area reserved for the federal government
Background image of page 4
Commerce Clause 5 Commerce Clause has 2 main impacts: Restrains  certain state actions Provides source of national authority for interstate activities ____”Free Trade”___ is the fundamental national  interest which is asserted Brief historical review of court review of  Congressional legislation based on Commerce Clause
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Commerce Clause 6 For the first 100 years, the high court had a very  narrow interpretation of interstate commerce. The standard applied by the US Supreme Court when  reviewing Commerce Clause cases:  is there sufficient  interstate contact or impact to justify federal  regulation? Think about this as we review some of the “big”  cases.
Background image of page 6
Commerce Clause 7 Examples of 3 early attempts by Congress to regulate trade between  and among the states and how the Supreme Court handled them: Interstate Commerce Act of 1887  – S. Court reviewed federal statute  in Shreveport Rate Case  (1914). Upheld  – Congress had authority  over interstate carriers as instruments of interstate commerce and  this necessarily includes the right to regulate options in all matters  related to interstate commerce Congress could pass a law regulating interstate commerce Sherman Anti-Trust Act of 1890  – S. Court reviewed federal statute in  Sugar Trust Case  (1895). Struck down . Gov. had no authority to  prevent creation of monopoly in sugar refining business Congress had no authority to pass this law  - there was not sufficient  interstate contract or impact to justify federal regulation
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
8 Child Labor Laws  – S. Court reviewed in Hammer v.  Dagenhart   (1918). Struck down   federal law  prohibiting transportation of goods manufactured by  certain children. Manufacturing was considered  solely intrastate --  not “commerce”. Congress had no authority to pass this law – 
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/17/2011 for the course GBL 395 taught by Professor Lashbrooke during the Fall '08 term at Michigan State University.

Page1 / 30

Constitutional_Principles - SelectedConstitutionalPrinciples

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online