Unit_2_-_Basic_Packaging_Functions

Unit_2_-_Basic_Packaging_Functions - Unit 2 Basic Packaging...

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2. 1 Unit 2 Basic Packaging Functions Packages perform four basic functions. If you look elsewhere for information on this, you may find some variability in how those functions are defined, but here they are containment, protection, communication, and utility. Any device that performs one or more of these four basic functions is considered to be a package. Depending on the package type, it may have only one of these functions or a combination of them. It is also possible for a single feature on a package to perform more than one function; something as simple as a corrugated box contains products but also protects them during shipping. If there is printing on the box, that is a form of communication. Also, keep in mind that the function of a package is related to whether it is a primary, secondary, or tertiary package. The choice of a package is dependent on many factors, including all of these functions, so working in the packaging field requires the ability to take all of these aspects into consideration. 2.1 Containment Containment is probably the most basic of the packaging functions. It simply holds a product in a manner that allows it to be grouped or enclosed and moved. Many products require some form of containment so they can be handled. The most common examples are liquids and free-flowing solids. 2.1.1 Liquids Liquids, obviously, need some sort of package or you would have a real mess on your hands, literally! Beverages are often packaged in jugs or bottles made from plastic or glass. Examples include milk, juices, beer, wine, and pop. Other package types used to contain beverages include cans, tetra paks, and retort pouches. A large variety of options for beverage packaging exist, and some beverage types are packaged in more than one kind of package. For example, juices can be packaged in all of the options listed. Here are some examples of beverage packages: Can Retort Pouches Glass Bottle HDPE Jug PETE Bottle
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2. 2 Tetra Paks There are countless other types of liquids that require a variety of containment packaging as well. These can include industrial types of products such as chemicals, pesticides, cleaning agents, and paint. These package types can include bottles and jugs, pails, cans, and drums. Other products include personal care items such as soap and shampoo, which are often packaged in plastic bottles, and nail polish and perfume, which are often packaged in glass bottles. And, of course there are food items like yogurt and pasta sauce, which are packaged in plastic cups and glass jars, respectively. Here are examples of some of these packages: HDPE Bottle 5 Gallon Pail Various Bottles and Cans
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2. 3 Plastic Bottle Can and HDPE Bottle Glass Bottles Glass Bottle PP Cup Glass Jar 2.1.2 Free-flowing Solids Free-flowing solids are another product type that requires containment because they can flow like liquids if not contained. Food items such as sugar and flour, salt and spices, cereal, and rice are all free-flowing solids. These can come packaged in all sorts of forms including
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This note was uploaded on 10/17/2011 for the course PKG 101 taught by Professor Haroldhughes during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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Unit_2_-_Basic_Packaging_Functions - Unit 2 Basic Packaging...

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