Chapter9_angel - KIN 216 Applied Human Anatomy Chapter 9...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
KIN 216 Applied Human Anatomy Chapter 9 Slides adapted from Dr Pfeiffer
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Articulations Articulations and skeletal contractions allow movement Arthro (Gr.) = joint Arthrology = the study of joints Arthralgia: pain in joints Joints are classified by function or structure Functional classification of joints Synarthroses (immovable) Amphiarthroses (slightly movable) Diarthroses (freely movable)
Background image of page 2
Articulations Structural classification of joints Fibrous Have bones connected by dense fibrous CT No joint capsule Range from immovable to slightly moveable (based on ligament lenghth) Sutures, syndesmoses, and gomphoses Cartilaginous Have bones connected by cartilage No joint capsule Allow limited movement (twisting, compression) Synchondroses and symphyses Synovial Have a joint capsule Allow different types of movement Classified by shape (more on this later)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fibrous Joints Sutures (“seams”) Only between skull bones Edges of joining bones are wavy and interlocking Short fibers = Immobile Form at about age 18 months (when you are younger than that, joints are called fontanels) When you reach adult status, sutural joints may completely ossify, then called
Background image of page 4
Fibrous Joints Syndesmoses Fibrous joints held together by ligaments Desm = ligament No joint capsule Slight movement (amount of movement depends on length of connecting fibers) Ex: distal tibiofibular joint
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Fibrous Joints Gomphoses Occur between teeth and jaw (“peg-in- socket”) Short periodontal ligament does not allow tooth root to move in alveolar process
Background image of page 6
Cartilaginous Joints Synchondroses Hyaline cartilage between articulating bones Some are temporary (ex- growth plate) and ossify later (also called synostosis)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cartilaginous Joints Symphyses Joined by fibrocartilage Provides cushioning, allows limited movement Ex. Pubic symphysis, intervertebral joints
Background image of page 8
Synovial Joints Freely moveable, enclosed by joint capsule Function: allow movement and provide stability (not able to have the best of both worlds – vary inversely) Range of motion Amount of movement allowed at a joint Determined by bone structure, characteristics of connective tissue, and muscles around joint
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
General Features of Synovial Joints Articular cartilage Hyaline cartilage around ends of bone, poorly vascularized Joint cavity Space that holds synovial fluid Joint capsule (articular capsule)
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 52

Chapter9_angel - KIN 216 Applied Human Anatomy Chapter 9...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online