Ch13 - Prepositions Objectives Use objective case pronouns as objects of prepositions Avoid using prepositions in place of verbs and adverbs Use

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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 2 Prepositions Objectives Use objective case pronouns as objects of prepositions. Avoid using prepositions in place of verbs and adverbs. Use eight troublesome prepositions correctly.
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 3 Prepositions Omit unnecessary prepositions and retain necessary ones. Construct formal sentences that avoid terminal prepositions. Recognize words and constructions requiring specific prepositions (idioms).
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 4 What are prepositions? Prepositions are words (or groups of words) that show the relationship of a noun or pronoun to another word in a sentence; they are connecting words.
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 5 Commonly Used Prepositions about below except into beside for on after between from in by over to at in in addition to along with according to on account of Prepositions
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 6 Prepositions Use objective case pronouns as objects of prepositions. Everyone except Les and him arrived early. Between you and me , sales are declining.
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 7 Fundamental Problems With Prepositions 1. Do not use the preposition of in place of the verb have . He should have walked. We could have received free tickets. Prepositions
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 8 2. Do not use off or off of in place of the preposition from . Don borrowed the pen from Mark. Prepositions
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 9 3. Do not use the word to in place of the adverb too , which means additionally or excessively . Give the sales receipts to the courier. We will visit the islands and seaports too . The van was too small to carry the team. Prepositions
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 10 Troublesome Prepositions among, between beside, besides except, accept in, into like Prepositions
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 11 Among/Between Among , meaning in or through the midst of , is normally used to speak of three or more persons or things. Profits will be divided among the nine partners. Between , meaning shared by , is normally used to speak of two persons or things. Responsibility will be divided between the vice president and the CEO. Prepositions
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Mary Ellen Guffey, Business English, 7e Ch. 13 - 12 Beside/Besides Beside means next to . Their parking lot is beside the office. Besides means in addition to . You have another option besides this one. Prepositions
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Ch. 13 - 13 Except/Accept Except means excluding or but . All pages
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This note was uploaded on 10/17/2011 for the course OA 265 taught by Professor Lbrotsker during the Spring '11 term at Community College of Philadelphia.

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Ch13 - Prepositions Objectives Use objective case pronouns as objects of prepositions Avoid using prepositions in place of verbs and adverbs Use

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