Alice chap 6 - 6 Chapter C5777 36525 1/6/06 12:06 PM Page...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
After finishing this chapter, you should be able to: o Provide a brief definition of the following terms: billboard, breakpoint, dialog balloon, font, HSB, personification, RGB, tessellation, text, thought bubble, and typeface o List and describe the different ways to add text to an Alice world o Use the say and think methods to add text messages to an Alice world o Place messages in a special zone below Alice’s playing world window with the print instruction o Add 3D text objects to an Alice world o Create a billboard from a picture file and manipulate it in an Alice world o Add sound to an Alice world TEXT AND SOUND IN ALICE WORLDS 153 6 6 Chapter C5777 36525 1/6/06 12:06 PM Page 153
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
154 Chapter 6 • Text and Sound in Alice Worlds ADDING ELEMENTS OF LANGUAGE TO AN ALICE WORLD Even in a visually rich, three-dimensional, animated virtual world, it is still important to be able to communicate using words—both visually and verbally. Back in Chapter 1, in Tutorial 1B, the first Alice world you created was a version of the traditional Hello, World! program. As you may recall, this program contained a text message. The word text is used to describe the visual use of words (that is, the written language) in a computer program. You can show text in an Alice world by: n Using the say and think methods to show an object’s speech and thoughts. n Using the print instruction to show messages in a special zone below the playing world window. n Adding 3D text as an Alice object. n Placing a picture file with an image of text in an Alice world as a billboard. The remainder of this chapter includes a brief discussion of each of the items in the preced- ing list. In addition, you will learn about sound files, which contain verbal messages that can be added to an Alice world and then played using an object’s play sound method. The discussions in the chapter are then followed by tutorials showing you how to use the respective techniques. THE say AND think METHODS Let’s start with a discussion of the say and think methods. Figure 6-1 shows a scene from a playing Alice world with text produced by the say and think methods. The text created by these methods appears in what animators call balloons or bubbles, much like text appears in cartoons in a newspaper or magazine. A dialog balloon shows words that are supposed to have been spoken by an object, and a thought bubble shows words that reflect an object’s thoughts. In Figure 6-1, Alice is shown saying “Simon says ‘Jump’!” in a dialog balloon pro- duced by a say instruction, while the Cheshire cat’s thoughts are shown in a thought bubble. 6 Chapter C5777 36525 1/6/06 12:06 PM Page 154
Background image of page 2
155 The say and think Methods The say and think methods can be used with every object in Alice, including inanimate objects like rocks, trees, buildings, and vehicles. Figure 6-2 shows a thought balloon associ- ated with a beach chair. Obviously beach chairs can’t think. The process of giving human qualities, such as feelings, thoughts, or human-like movements, to inanimate objects is a
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 10/17/2011 for the course CIS 106 taught by Professor Alice during the Spring '11 term at Community College of Philadelphia.

Page1 / 34

Alice chap 6 - 6 Chapter C5777 36525 1/6/06 12:06 PM Page...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online