l3 - Perceiving Persons ATP 3: Social Psychology 3:...

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ATP 3: Social Psychology 3: Perceiving Persons Perceiving Persons
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ATP 3: Social Psychology 3: Perceiving Persons Lecture Overview Attribution theories Cognitive heuristics, errors, and biases Priming effects Implicit personality theories Primacy effects Confirmation biases
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ATP 3: Social Psychology 3: Perceiving Persons Social perception “This subject concerns the qualities that people perceive in others and the factors. ..that contribute to these perceptions” Zebrowitz (1995, p. 583)
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ATP 3: Social Psychology 3: Perceiving Persons Nonverbal behavior The six innate and universal basic emotions (SHAFDS) Sad Happy Anger Fear Disgust Surprise Japan 87 90 67 65 60 94 Scotland 86 98 84 86 79 88 Sumatra 91 69 70 70 70 78 Turkey 76 87 79 76 74 90 USA 92 95 81 84 86 92
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ATP 3: Social Psychology 3: Perceiving Persons Attribution theories Attribution theories describe how people attempt to explain the causes of behaviour. Heider (1958) differentiated between ‘personal’ and ‘situational’ attributions. Another common distinction is between stable and unstable causes of behaviour. Another is made in terms of controllability.
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ATP 3: Social Psychology 3: Perceiving Persons What is a correspondent inference ? Influenced by Perceived choice (CI if high) Intended effects (CI if few benefits to actor) Expectedness (CI if unexpected)
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ATP 3: Social Psychology 3: Perceiving Persons Kelley’s (1967) covariation theory We attribute causality to factors that co-vary with behaviours. Behaviour can be attributed to the actor, a stimulus they are reacting to, or the situation they are acting in. Three types of covariation information may be used.
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l3 - Perceiving Persons ATP 3: Social Psychology 3:...

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