Week 3 Discussion with Article

Week 3 Discussion with Article - Week 3 Discussion...

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Unformatted text preview: Week 3 Discussion According to Lowell W. Monke, "Our students need inner resources and real-life experiences to balance their high-tech lives. Read the following article written by Monke and answer the questions in this discussion. Attached Article: Overdominance of Computers Be Prepared to Discuss this in Class! 1.Do you agree or disagree with the author? Why? 2.What are the implications for the classroom at the grade level you are teaching or plan to teach? The Overdominance Our students need inner resources and realAije experiences to balance their high-tech lives. Lowell W. Monke T he debate chums on over the effectiveness of computers as learning tools. Although there is a growing disillusionment with the promise of computers to revolutionize education, their position in schools is protected by the fear that without them students will not be prepared for the demands of a high-tech 21st century. This fallback argument ultimately trumps every criticism of educational computing, but it is rarely examined closely Lets start by accepting the premise of the argument: Schools need to prepare young people for a high-tech society. Does it automatically follow that children of all ages should use high-tech tools? Most people assume that it does, and that's the end of the argument. But we don't prepare children for an automobile-dependent society by finding ways for 10-year-olds to drive cars, or prepare people to use alcohol responsibly by teaching them how to drink when they are 6. My point is that preparation does not necessarily warrant early participation. Indeed, preparing young people quite often involves strengthening their inner resourceslike self-discipline, moral judgment, and empathybefore gi\ing them the opportu- nity to participate. Great Power and Poor Preparation The more powerful the toolsand computers are powerfulthe more life experience and inner strength students must have to handle that power wisely On the day my Advanced Computer Technology classroom got wired to tbe Internet, it struck me that I was about to give my high school students great power to harm a lot of people, and all at a safe distance. They could inflict emotional pain 20 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP/DECEMBER 2005/JANUARY 2006 of Computers with a few keystrokes and never have to witness the tears shed. They could destroy hours of work accomplished by others who were not their enemies just poorly protected network users whose files provided convenient bull's- eyes for youth flexing newfound tech- nical muscles. 1 also realized that it would take years to instill the ethical discipline needed to say no to flexing tbat technical power. Young people entering my course needed more firsthand experiences guided by adults. They needed more cbances to directly connect tbeir own actions with the consequences of those actions, and to reflect on the outcomes, before tbey started using tools that could trigger serious consequences on the other side of the world....
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Week 3 Discussion with Article - Week 3 Discussion...

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