Week 4 Discussion with Articles

Week 4 Discussion with Articles - Week4Discussion There are...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Week 4 Discussion There are many technology tools that can help students learn in the classroom, but how are they used? Read the articles and answer the questions in this discussion topic. Attached Articles: Tools for the Mind Technology to Help Struggling Students Be Prepared to Discuss this in Class! 1. Why are schools using computers primarily to teach low-level skills when technology has the potential to deepen student learning? 2. What can be done to change this? 3. What technology is available to help struggling students? 4. How can it be used by the classroom teacher?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tools for the Why are schools using computers primarily to teach low-level skills when technology has the potential to deepen student learning? Mary Burns R evisiting the literature from the 1990s on instructional technology is like jour- neying back to a more nostalgic and hopeful time when the promise of computers—and their potential impact on student learning—appeared boundless. Used in concert with a leamer-centered instruc- tional approach and a curriculum that focused on authentic learning. computers, it was thought, would serve as "mind tools" Qonassen, 1996) to build students' higher-order thinking skills. In fact, the terms computers and higher-order thinking formed a sort of double helix in instructional technology parlance. Infrastmctural supports in the United States—such as E-rate and federal funding for hardware, software, and teacher training initiatives—exem- plified a commitment to the belief that computers could transform student learning. How different the present era. With proposed budget cuts for teacher tech- nology training programs, the mandates of NCLB, and, most important, no body of research unequivocally linking student technology use to improved learning, the pendulum has shifted. Computers will certainly not disappear from schools, but educators and education officials are currently scrutinizing their potential value as an instructional tool. This diminished enthusiasm may prove beneficial in the long run. By 48 EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP/DECEMBER 2005/JANI)AR¥ 2006
Background image of page 2
I reflecting on the original goals for instructional technology and reevalu- ating prevailing patterns of classroom technology use, we can begin to bridge the gap between intention and imple- mentation. What Happened to Eureka? Can technology improve student leaming? Yes. Computers can provide transformative student leaming experi- ences thai would otherwise not be possible. One such moment occurred during an activity 1 conducted with social studies teachers, in which they were tasked with reapportioning the 435 members of the House of Represen- tatives across the 50 states using 2000 Census population data. Although these teachers "covered" reapportionment in the curriculum, they had never really understood its impact nor the impact of the Connecticut Compromise on each state's share of electoral votes—until they used spreadsheets to model reap- portionment. They realized that each persons vote is weighted differently,
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 11

Week 4 Discussion with Articles - Week4Discussion There are...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online