Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 (The Judiciary) October 11, 2011 PPIA...

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Chapter 7 (The Judiciary) October 11, 2011
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PPIA Junior Summer Institute The PPIA Junior Summer Institutes (JSI) is an intensive seven-week summer program that focuses on preparing students for graduate programs in public and international affairs and careers as policy professionals, public administrators and other leadership roles in public service. The JSI curriculum includes economics, statistics, domestic/international policy issues and leadership topics, all designed to sharpen the students' quantitative, analytic and communication skills. Extracurricular activities are also included. These skills are vital for admission into the top graduate programs in public and international affairs . As a PPIA Fellow you are entitled to the following benefits: Full tuition at a PPIA Junior Summer Institute. Eligibility to receive assistance with travel expenses. Minimum of $1,000 stipend. University housing with a meal plan. Books and related course materials. GRE prep. http://www.ppiaprogram.org/programs/jsi.php
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Institute for Humane Studies The Charles G. Koch Summer Fellow Program combines a paid public policy internship with two career skills seminars and weekly policy lectures . It includes a $1,500 stipend and a housing allowance. The 10-week program includes: June 4 – August 12, 2011 Eight-week internship at a state or federal policy organization Week-long seminars, before and after the internship Weekly lectures on popular policy issues Professional resume review $1,500 stipend plus housing assistance A limited number of travel scholarships http://www.theihs.org/programs/charles-g-koch-summer-fellow- program
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The Great Compromise (Chapter 7) The framers of the U.S. Constitution had to address the following questions: 1) What should be done about slavery (outlawed or recognized)? The document didn’t forbid slavery and said that slaves who escaped to free states had to be returned to their owners. Congress eventually outlawed it in 1808, but the practice continued for years afterwards though.
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The Great Compromise 2) How should they be counted for representation in the House of Representatives? Count each slave as
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This note was uploaded on 10/17/2011 for the course AFA 3930 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Florida.

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Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 (The Judiciary) October 11, 2011 PPIA...

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