Electricity and Magnetism 2

Electricity and Magnetism 2 - Back to electric potential...

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Back to electric potential Negative charge makes a valley
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Potential (gravitational or electric) and force
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Electric field and potential
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Electric field and potential
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Earth’s electric field
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Lightning
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Electric field and potential
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Example
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Example
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Electric currents Suppose I have an electric current flowing through a conductor What is the net charge in the conductor? Zero I haven’t added any electrons to the circuit, only made use of the ones already there And for every electron,there’s a proton with the same magnitude of charge, but opposite sign
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AC/DC Electric current may be DC (direct current) or AC (alternating current) A battery produces a direct current electrons are always moving away from the repelling - terminal of the battery and towards the + terminal An AC current alternates direction electrons in the circuit are moved first one way, and then the opposite direction, alternating at a frequency that typically is 60 cycles per second (60 Hertz) this switching is done by a generator periodically switching the sign of the terminals
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Why AC? Why 110 V? Electric energy in the form of AC can easily be stepped up to high voltages to be transmitted large distances with little heat loss, then stepped down to lower voltages where the energy is used In the early days of electrical lighting, high voltages burned out electric light filaments, so low voltages were more practical 110 V (now 120 V) was established because it made the bulbs of the day glow as brightly as gas lamps By the time electrical lighting made it to Europe, engineers had figured out how to make lightbulbs that wouldn’t burn out
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Electricity and Magnetism 2 - Back to electric potential...

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